Inclusive Classrooms

Is It Inclusion?

Elementary students joining hands in an inclusive classroom

Confused about inclusion and what a student's experience is like in an inclusive classroom? Use this handy chart to help you understand what inclusion is and isn't!

YES NO
Child spends the majority of the day in the general education classroom. Child spends the majority of the day in a special education classroom and goes to a general education classroom for one or two periods.
Child's desk is included with the other groups of desks in the classroom. Child's desk is away from the other desks in the classroom.
Child has access to and is included in classroom lessons and activities that are adapted or modified to meet his/her special needs. Child works on his/her own curriculum.
Child attends outside activities with the class including assemblies, field trips, enrichment classes, and recess. Child is given alternate activities and options with other special education students.
Child is an independent, valued, and respected classroom member. Child is looked upon as helpless, needy, and dependent.
The child's paraprofessional facilitates access to the curriculum and classroom activities. The child's paraprofessional determines access to the curriculum and classroom activities.
The paraprofessional encourages child to complete work as independently as possible, while providing support when needed. The paraprofessional does not provide many opportunities for the child to complete work independently and "hovers."
Child receives specialist support (therapy, speech, and language) with minimal disruption to the class routine and program. Child is pulled from the classroom lessons and activities for specialist suport without consideration for what the child will miss.
The teacher can identify your child's strengths and areas for improvement. The teacher refers to the specialists and paraprofessionals to identify child's development.
Child can name classmates and has many common classroom experiences. Child does not know classmates and does not have many common classroom experiences.

Nicole Eredics is an educator who specializes in the inclusion of students with disabilities in the general education classroom. She draws upon her years of experience as a full inclusion teacher to write, speak, and consult on the topic of inclusive education to various national and international organizations. She specializes in giving practical and easy-to-use solutions for inclusion. Nicole is creator of The Inclusive Class blog and author of a new guidebook for teachers and parents called, Inclusion in Action: Practical Strategies to Modify Your Curriculum. For more information about Nicole and all her work, visit her website

Nicole Eredics (2014)

Reprints

For any reprint requests, please contact the author or publisher listed.

Add comment

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
"There is no substitute for books in the life of a child." — May Ellen Chase