Today’s Reading News


Each weekday, Reading Rockets gathers interesting news headlines about reading and early education. Please note that Reading Rockets does not necessarily endorse these views or any others on these outside websites.

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Time
August 12, 2022

As a teacher in Oakland, Calif., Kareem Weaver helped struggling fourth- and fifth-grade kids learn to read by using a very structured, phonics-based reading curriculum called Open Court. It worked for the students, but not so much for the teachers. The teachers felt like curriculum robots—and pushed back. Now Weaver is heading up a campaign to get his old school district to reinstate many of the methods that teachers resisted so strongly: specifically, systematic and consistent instruction in phonemic awareness and phonics. Weaver and his co-petitioners—including civil rights, educational, and literacy groups—want schools to spend more time in the youngest grades teaching the sounds that make up words and the letters that represent those sounds. His petition is part of an enormous rethink of reading instruction that is sweeping the U.S.

Education Week
August 11, 2022

It’s an extremely personal decision for educators with disabilities to decide when to share their experiences and with whom. Some have kept their diagnoses private; others started talking about it publicly to help students and families. Some did so after their seeing their own children struggle to get appropriate resources and accommodations in K-12. Others believe that showing vulnerability builds trust. Winston Sakurai, a former school principal who was diagnosed with dyslexia as a college student, thinks broadly about the needs of students—not just those with disabilities—when policies are being developed. He’s constantly asking, “‘Is there something that we are missing that we can actually help the students with?’ ”

New America
August 11, 2022

Kids like to hear from other kids. The Kindergrams project builds on that realization. In the early days of designing their project, the LSX fellows were thinking about how to encourage children to ask questions of each other; soon that idea evolved into a multi-country project to collect and share audio clips from children around the world. “Kids ask a lot of questions, but those questions are not just about seeking information,” says Learning Sciences Exchange (LSX) Fellow Medha Tare. “They are also looking for connection.”

NBC (Dallas-Ft. Worth, TX)
August 11, 2022

Fort Worth ISD is set to expand a specialized Early Reading Program after the pilot saw success in the 2021-2022 school year. Students were thrusts into stories about topics they actually enjoy, increasing their motivation to read. “It’s not an accident that that worked,” Robert Rogers, President of the Reading League Texas said. “There are some strategies for teaching reading that are highly effective and there are some strategies that are not.” Reading League Texas is the regional chapter for the national organization. Their mission is to ensure all teachers understand the best evidence-based methods to teach literacy.

Edutopia
August 11, 2022

Teachers can help students develop data literacy by asking them to collect, organize, and make sense of information about the world. Here are 6 ways to bring data science into your classroom. For example: (1) Connect data science to the content you’re teaching: Think about ways to incorporate data tasks and discussions about data into your existing instruction; and (2) Weave data throughout many subjects: Teaching about data and building data literacy doesn’t have to be limited to math or science instruction. Elementary classrooms have a unique opportunity to look for occasions to leverage data when teaching all subjects.

Hechinger Report
August 10, 2022

When Lauren McKinnon heard a new public elementary school was opening close to her home in Dallas, it was good news; but when she learned the school would offer an all-girls education format with a focus on STEM, she was excited, knowing inequities often exist for girls – like her daughters – in math and science. But something else stood out about the school that attracted McKinnon: its potential for a student body that looked more like Dallas as a whole. Dallas school districts are seeing success with ‘Transformation Schools’ that offer a socioeconomically mixed student body.

The New York Times
August 10, 2022

Raymond Briggs, the children’s author whose cheeky illustrations dignified workaday British life and an audacious breadth of emotions, most prominently in the wordless escapades of “The Snowman,” has died. By piling up square and rectangular frames like toy blocks, Mr. Briggs helped bring the visual language of comic books to children’s stories. Despite primarily gearing his work for children, some of his most successful books are meditations on death. “The Snowman” (1978), which was adapted into one of England’s most popular Christmas films, focuses on a fleeting friendship between a young boy and a snowman.

Edutopia
August 8, 2022

Durable learning—the kind that sticks around and can become the foundation of a growing body of internalized knowledge—comes from hard work and even some degree of cognitive resistance. We scoured the research to find five relatively simple classroom strategies—selecting paper-and-pencil activities, for example, over activities that might require more setup—that will push students to the next level of comprehension.

The 74
August 8, 2022

Experts say most teachers have only limited training in gifted education and tend to focus on students’ limitations rather than their strengths, leaving twice exceptional learners particularly vulnerable. In some cases, these students’ disabilities can mask their aptitude. In others, their accelerated nature can hide their challenges.

School Library Journal
August 8, 2022

These 10 Spanish-language and bilingual early readers are perfect for early elementary kids starting to read independently.

Rewire
August 8, 2022

A new study from neuroscientists at the University of California-Berkeley found that whether you’re reading a story or listening to it, you’re activating the same parts of your brain. Delilah Orpi, a literary specialist who works with struggling readers and students with dyslexia, has been using audiobooks in her teaching for years. She says audiobooks and podcasts aren’t as passive as watching videos. That makes all the difference. “When listening to a book or podcast we must visualize what we hear and make a 'mental movie' much like we do as we read printed text,” she said. “Through visualizing we can comprehend and recall information. Listening to stories actually strengthens our comprehension skills.”

Education Week
August 4, 2022

New federal data provide a glimpse into what strategies schools have used to support learning recovery, and which ones school leaders think are most effective. The results show that while some research-tested models—such as intensive tutoring—have become popular, other strategies touted by prominent education groups haven’t gained as much traction. And schools report that the learning recovery methods they have been using have had mixed effects. That may partly be because both student and staff quarantines and absences continued to disrupt time in classrooms this past year, and schools reported high levels of teacher burnout.

The 74
August 4, 2022

Four times a week, the waiting room at the St. Vincent de Paul food pantry in Indianapolis is filled. More than 3,000 families use the service, watching TV and letting their children play with donated toys to pass the time until it’s their turn. But starting later this summer, the waiting room will include a free library where children and families can choose books to take home.

Education Week
August 3, 2022

Answer 10 questions to assess your knowledge on learning differences.

Edutopia
August 3, 2022

Every new school year, children, teachers, and parents struggle through a swirl of emotions that can undermine a joyful beginning. As teachers, we need to successfully handle those feelings, which may include expectations, anxiety, and even some fear about the demands of the new school year. Here are suggestions for making the transition to school easier for first-time learners starts with a few strategies that account for their emotions and uncertainty.

Edutopia
August 3, 2022

When working with students with sensory needs and difficulties focusing, fidgets can be a vital tool to help them stay engaged. Students with these needs can use these tools to burn off excess energy, reduce classroom anxiety, and energize their bodies to remain involved with the lesson. The key is to pick the right kind of fidget. They need to be quiet and low-tech and serve a purpose. The students also need to be taught the appropriate way to use them. The students must know that these are tools, not toys.

Press and Guide (Dearborn, MI)
August 3, 2022

The Dearborn Public Library now offers literacy kits for families to use with children in preschool through third grade. The literacy kits were developed to help students and families practice skills identified in Michigan’s Read by Grade Three law: phonics, phonemic awareness, comprehension, vocabulary, and fluency. Read by Grade Three Literacy Kits are sorted by literacy skill and grade level. Each kit includes a sheet explaining the featured skill, activity suggestions, book suggestions, and a VOX talking book. The VOX talking books are books with an audio player that allows children to listen to a fluent reader and follow along with the text.

Hechinger Report
August 1, 2022

Tutoring is by far the most effective way to help children catch up at school, according to rigorous research studies. The research community urged schools to spend a big chunk of their roughly $190 billion in federal pandemic recovery funds on what is called “high-dosage” tutoring. Many schools embraced this sort of frequent tutoring ... but [preliminary data points are not] proof that tutoring is working. “We need to be prepared for underwhelming results from tutoring operations,” said Brown University’s Matthew Kraft who leads the effort to study tutoring efforts in Nashville. He believes it will take time for schools to figure this out. “Changing educational systems at scale is hard.”

Edutopia
August 1, 2022

To become better readers, Natalie Wexler says, students should grapple with abundant, high-caliber texts in the elementary grades—not just skills and strategies.

School Library Journal
August 1, 2022

Looking for fresh picks to add to your Spanish-language board book collections? These seven titles fit perfectly in little ones’ hands and are just right for lapsits and baby story time.

The New York Times
July 29, 2022

Ubiquitous video technology and social media have given deaf people a new way to communicate. They’re using it to transform American Sign Language. Over the past decade or so, smartphones and social media have allowed ASL users to connect with one another as never before. Face-to-face interaction, once a prerequisite for most sign language conversations, is no longer required. Video has also given users the opportunity to teach more people the language — there are thriving ASL communities on YouTube and TikTok — and the ability to quickly invent and spread new signs, to reflect either the demands of the technology or new ways of thinking.

Education Week
July 29, 2022

More than half of the states are mandating changes to how early reading is taught. The process of phasing in new methods, materials, and philosophies will be challenging. Education Week’s new series of stories looks deeply at how the attempt to change teaching practice at scale is unfolding on the ground. The collection examines the national landscape and dives deep into the experience of one state—North Carolina—as it implemented a new reading law this past school year. Here are five of the most important takeaways to get you started.

Education Week
July 27, 2022

The shifts in reading teaching that many states are asking schools to make go beyond simply adding a few new practices to teachers’ toolboxes. Instead, the “science of reading” asks teachers and leaders to adopt a new framework of how skilled reading develops—and what educators need to do to support that process. The most commonly cited requirement in legislation is for professional development—meant to increase teacher knowledge related to the science of reading, or to help them apply new learning to practice. The policies proposed in these laws are “a real mixed bag” in how effective they might be in changing student outcomes, said Nell Duke, a professor of early literacy development at the University of Michigan.

Education Week
July 27, 2022

As of July 20, 2022, 29 states have passed laws or implemented new policies related to evidence-based reading instruction since 2013. State officials hope that these mandates will shift classroom practice, which will in turn help more students become proficient readers. But reading researchers and practitioners say that the process is rarely that simple. Even if states are promoting practices with a strong evidence base, initiatives of this scale require careful implementation to be successful. It’s still unclear whether many of these legislative actions will move the needle on student achievement, experts say.

K-12 Dive
July 27, 2022

Two schools in the Aldine Independent School District near Houston, Texas, went from lower performing school status to high performing ranking in reading and math achievement in 2021-22. Their school year spanned nearly a full year, at 210 school days. Superintendent LaTonya Goffney credits that longer school year for such strong and rapid academic improvements. It hasn’t just been the academics that have improved, Goffney said, but family engagement and whole-child supports have also increased at those campuses.

Edutopia
July 27, 2022

As a young writer wannabe growing up in rural West Virginia, I never imagined the possibilities for connecting with authors that have been made possible by videoconferencing platforms. I never even imagined that authors would be interested in engaging with me—but I’ve seen firsthand the enthusiasm that writers have for school audiences. At this point, I’ve helped facilitate about 10 virtual visits for authors with K–6 students online, as well as an online author visit with one of my undergraduate classes. Interacting with the author of a book they’ve read is a powerful way to engage students and gives them deep insight into the writing process.

Education Week
July 25, 2022

As states and districts overhaul the way their schools teach reading, many are banking on one specific professional-learning program to propel this transformation: Language Essentials for Teachers of Reading and Spelling, commonly known as LETRS. LETRS instructs teachers in what literacy skills need to be taught, why, and how to plan to teach them. The LETRS sequence takes a “speech to print” approach to teaching foundational skills. This idea—that explicitly and systematically teaching young children how sounds represent letters is the most effective way to teach them how to read words—is based on decades of research evidence. It’s a core tenet of the approach now being called the “science of reading.” But LETRS, like the science of reading, isn’t just about word reading. The second year of LETRS is all about language comprehension, and its method differs from typical approaches.

Hechinger Report
July 25, 2022

There’s a lot to like about digital books. They’re lighter in the backpack and often cheaper than paper books. But a new international report suggests that physical books may be important to raising children who become strong readers. OECD researchers are most worried about poorer students. As poor students gain access to technology, they lag behind rich students in access to physical books.

Education Week
July 25, 2022

Sometimes adapting instruction is just about making decisions in the moment to reach all students, regardless of their gifts or challenges.

K-12 Dive
July 25, 2022

Students may need summer classes to stem learning loss between school years, but traditional summer school classes have given way to newer offerings that combine camp-like activities with academic lessons. Planning these robust summer learning opportunities takes time and effort to create attractive models students want to try, said Catherine Augustine, senior policy researcher with the RAND Corp., and one of two primary investigators for the nonprofit think tank’s National Summer Learning Project.

The Conversation
July 21, 2022

Over the summer, students typically lose the equivalent of about a month’s worth of learning, mostly in the areas of math facts and spelling. Research has also found that summer learning loss is more severe among students with disabilities, English language learners and students living in poverty. Some parents take advantage of school-based programs that can help students keep up their academic skills during the summer. But there are still ways that parents and other caregivers can stave off summer loss that do not involve school. Here are six.

Education Week
July 21, 2022

North Carolina is one of more than two dozen states that have embarked on an attempt to radically transform reading instruction over the past few years. The goal is to bring instruction in line with the decades of research on how young children learn to read. Reaching that goal will be messy and hard. “Your philosophy on reading is as deep as religion,” said Sherri Miller, the principal at Lacy Elementary School in Wake County, N.C. “I’ve had many matches with people where you just go round and round and round. It’s kind of like the politics in our country.” For many teachers in North Carolina and the other states pursuing “science of reading,” the demands to change will require a seismic shift in how they teach and a complete rethinking of their best practices and beliefs.

The New York Times
July 21, 2022

Lucy Calkins’s eagerly anticipated new curriculum was meant to address her critics with a more research-backed, phonics-based approach to literacy. But its publication has been stalled after a debate over whether to accommodate conservative state laws. For critics of Professor Calkins’s long reluctance to emphasize phonics, the latest problems only add to their sense of frustration. Margaret Goldberg, a California literacy coach, pointed out that without new curriculum materials, thousands of schools and teachers nationwide might not realize that Professor Calkins was advising a major shift in literacy strategies, in part because she had not sent out free corrections for any of her old curriculum materials. The publication delay comes as millions of young children across the country lag in foundational reading skills after more than two years of pandemic disruptions.

KQED Mindshift
July 21, 2022

At the International Society for Technology in Education conference in July, a number of education leaders and teachers discussed a framework that can help build students’ problem-solving skills in any subject: computational thinking. They outlined four strategies that make up the computational thinking process: Decomposition — breaking a complex problem into smaller parts or questions; Pattern recognition — identifying trends, differences or similarities in data; and Abstraction — removing unnecessary elements or data to focus on what’s useful in solving a problem.

School Library Journal
July 21, 2022

At the playground with his young children, U.K. author James Catchpole often finds himself fielding questions from kids about why he only has one leg. Catchpole responds much better to the question at 40 than he could at five, he says. But it still sends him back to his childhood and the awkwardness he felt when faced with that query again and again. That experience prompted him to write What Happened to You?, about Joe, who only wants to play pirates and is fed up with people at the playground asking why he’s missing a leg. His book complements the very small, but growing, number of illustrated books featuring characters with physical disabilities.

Edutopia
July 21, 2022

Community and connection are more vital than ever as children reconnect after nearly two years of disrupted learning and isolation. Last year—the toughest one in terms of behavior management that I can remember—I used three tools to create a positive community in my second-grade classroom. They helped me build students’ self-esteem, teach empathy and problem-solving, and inspire leadership among my students. This was my most successful year for behavior management, despite having a handful of children who needed a lot of support.

KQED Mindshift
July 20, 2022

What do we know about how kids are catching up at school as the pandemic drags on? The good news, according to the latest achievement data, is that learning resumed at a more typical pace during the 2021-22 school year that just ended. Despite the Delta and Omicron waves that sent many students and teachers into quarantine and disrupted school, children’s math and reading abilities generally improved as much as they had in years before the pandemic.

Education Week
July 20, 2022

Parents can serve as valuable education resources for their children—and teachers. Get links to 21 articles and other resources to support parent engagement.

Language Magazine
July 20, 2022

Cox Campus, the online learning community of the Rollins Center for Language and Literacy at the Atlanta Speech School, is providing free, evidence-based courses, community, and resources for literacy educators. In 2021, Cox Campus surpassed 200,000 members and provided $15 million of professional development coursework to educators across early education and kindergarten through third grade. The Cox Campus addresses the continuum of deep reading brain construction from the third trimester of pregnancy through literacy. The coursework available on the website is grounded in equity and founded on structured literacy practices.

New America
July 20, 2022

New America and MDRC recently hosted a webinar bringing together leading researchers and practitioners working with DLL communities to envision new assessments for DLLs. These experts surfaced several core aspects of an accurate, actionable, and equitable assessment approach for DLLs. One recommendation: Employ multiple assessment approaches to identify DLLs and understand their proficiency in each language.

Hechinger Report
July 19, 2022

We must continue teaching reading throughout all grades. Students are never “done” learning to read. In fact, even we adult readers can continue to push our capabilities and grow with advanced texts that take us into unfamiliar subjects. If we could give our students a love of reading, bolstered by a vast vocabulary, broad background knowledge, proficient decoding skills and instruction on how to navigate complex syntax, American education would change drastically. Our country, then populated with critical readers, would change too.

CBS News
July 19, 2022

Jason Reynolds is not only a prolific and bestselling author, he's also the national ambassador for young people's literature. He visits mostly out-of-the-way towns, like Ronan, Montana, on the Flathead Indian reservation, where he met with middle-school students. "I don't sell them on books by selling them on books. The fastest way to lose a child is to tell a child to read." Instead, he encourages them to embrace their stories. "To me, reading becomes a lot more palatable if young people realize that the stories, the books that exist within them, are as valuable as the books that exist on the outside of them," Reynolds said. "And we have to be able to imagine the stories that don't exist."

National Public Radio
July 18, 2022

The U.S. student body is more diverse than ever before. Nevertheless, public schools remain highly segregated along racial, ethnic and socioeconomic lines. That's according to a report released Thursday by the U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO). More than a third of students (about 18.5 million of them) attended a predominantly same-race/ethnicity school during the 2020-21 school year, the report finds. And 14% of students attended schools where almost all of the student body was of a single race/ethnicity. "There is clearly still racial division in schools," says Jackie Nowicki, the director of K-12 education at the GAO and lead author of the report. She adds that schools with large proportions of Hispanic, Black and American Indian/Alaska Native students — minority groups with higher rates of poverty than white and Asian American students — are also increasing. "What that means is you have large portions of minority children not only attending essentially segregated schools, but schools that have less resources available to them."

Minding the Gap
July 18, 2022

How do kids learn to read? Three widely used infographics try to answer that question, but they leave out some crucial information. But none of them capture the complexity of reading comprehension. The risk is that educators will interpret the infographics to mean that the current approach to teaching comprehension aligns with science, and all they need to fix are problems on the decoding end. Nothing could be further from the truth.

Hawaii Public Radio
July 18, 2022

Local artist Shar Tuiasoa has just published her first children’s book, "Punky Aloha." It brings readers into the world of the little Polynesian girl whose adventure in search of fresh butter for her grandmother's banana bread is filled with surprising twists and turns. With the help of magic sunglasses, Punky learns to overcome her shyness and make new friends along the way.

The 74
July 18, 2022

The U.S. Department of Education wants to make it easier for families to find high-quality summer and afterschool programs and for schools and local governments to use federal relief funds to pay for them. Education Secretary Miguel Cardona on Thursday announced Engage Every Student — a partnership with five leading organizations to bring information and research about out-of-school-time programs together into one “centralized, readily available location.” The department will seek applications from an outside organization for a $3-$4 million contract in next year’s budget to run the initiative.

Publishers Weekly
July 15, 2022

Nonfiction for kids has an image problem—at home, at school, and in the media. Despite a robust body of research showing that many children prefer nonfiction, and many more enjoy fiction and nonfiction equally, most adults mistakenly believe children prefer made-up stories. As a result, well-intended parents favor fiction for bedtime reading, and most teachers automatically choose made-up stories for read alouds and book talks as well as science and social studies lessons.

Language Magazine
July 14, 2022

Transfer is “the ability to directly apply one’s previous learning to a new setting or problem” (Schwartz and Bransford, 1998, p. 68). We see everyday examples of transfer when we learn what a stop sign is and recognize it in another country where we can’t actually read the word stop itself. We see transfer in the way we still know what a chair is regardless of the material used to make it. Yet, for emergent bilinguals and dual language (DL) students developing biliteracy, transfer serves a more important role. Research has confirmed that when we use cross-linguistic transfer, it not only enhances but accelerates reading ability.

Education Week
July 14, 2022

An estimated 6.1 million children in the United States have been diagnosed with ADHD. Millions more children with the disorder are surely left undiagnosed. Early intervention is so crucial for success down the road, at home and at school. It is important that teachers—who play a key observational role in ADHD assessments in a school setting—understand that many factors can play into a diagnosis and how racial, gender, and age biases can affect those factors. It is equally important that school systems provide educators additional support through more objective testing measures, many of which already exist.

Education Week
July 14, 2022

Months of lockdowns have left a massive backlog of children who show the warning signs of autism, waiting for a formal evaluation to get help. That’s why Megan Roberts hopes to move autism evaluations out of doctors’ offices and onto Zoom conferences, using staff who already work regularly with schools and early learning centers. Roberts’s project is one of seven projects that have been awarded a share of $14 million grants from the National Center for Special Education Research. All of the funded projects are focused on supporting students with disabilities who have been disproportionately affected by the pandemic.

NBC (Yakima, WA)
July 14, 2022

Nikki Prather wrote the book 'The Bird Who Couldn't Fly,' to help kids better understand those around them with autism. Prather's inspiration? Her ten-year-old daughter with autism, who's also nonverbal. The book turned the page to a new chapter for her daughter, Genevieve. Since publishing in 2020, Prather said she's seen her make more friends and do better in school. Prather read to Genevieve's classmates and to other elementary schools in the West Valley School District during World Autism Awareness Month. "It was really helpful, they genuinely asked great questions about how they could be a better friend to her," said Prather.

School Library Journal
July 13, 2022

What is the Blueberry Award? Launched on March 21, 2022, the spring equinox, the award was founded by a team at Evanston Public Library. We felt it was long overdue to have a national award that celebrates the work that children’s book authors, scientists and illustrators are doing to support kids’ love of the natural world and desire to heal it. The winner amongst the 2021 books is How to Find a Fox by Kate Gardner, illustrated by Ossi Saarinen. We also named twenty-five Honor books and six Changemaker books that help kids act! We need that many honored books because kids need a whole library to learn about our incredibly complex planet and all the things we can do to slow global warming.

Education Week
July 13, 2022

Based on the research, here are five things school and district leaders should know about how summer slide and COVID slide affect each other, and how schools can structure summer programs to help students accelerate their learning: each type of “slide” can make the other steeper; COVID hit summer school, too; iInstructional time matters; students seriously need to relax; and summer programs need teacher prep, too.

Ed Surge
July 13, 2022

As we seek to emerge from the pandemic and reimagine schools so that students do not just recover from the pandemic but are set up to thrive, what if we normalized schools as hubs with student supports? Last week, the Biden-Harris Administration launched the National Partnership for Student Success (NPSS) as a step in this direction. This three-year initiative brings together a coalition of more than 70 education, service and youth-development organizations to recruit, train and support an additional 250,000 adults to provide targeted student supports in schools. It is a partnership spearheaded by the U.S. Department of Education, Americorps, and the Everyone Graduates Center at Johns Hopkins University. The NPSS aims to be a national body that supports local efforts.

The 74
July 13, 2022

When it comes to academic interventions, given a choice between technology and a human being, “we always choose a person,” says Megan Murphy, head of school at Circle City Prep in Indianapolis. That’s why this spring, instead of bringing in some sort of artificial intelligence app to help students learn to read, Murphy turned to an online resource that brings live tutors into her classrooms. Ignite! Reading trains its instructors — mainly college students working toward a teaching degree — using materials from the National Council on Teacher Quality. They are then paired with young students across the country to run daily 15-minute tutoring sessions via Zoom.

Edutopia
July 13, 2022

With adequate supports, students with individualized education programs can succeed in the general education curriculum.

International Literacy Association Daily
July 11, 2022

The International Literacy Association (ILA) announced today the winners of its 2022 awards and grants, including its top honor and one of the literacy field’s most prestigious—the William S. Gray Citation of Merit—which was awarded to City University of New York’s Linnea Ehri. The William S. Gray Citation of Merit honors a nationally or internationally known individual for their outstanding contributions to multiple facets of literacy development, including research, theory, practice, and policy. Ehri's findings on the importance of grapheme-phoneme knowledge, phonemic awareness, decoding skills, and orthographic mapping have greatly contributed to today’s understandings about psychology processes and sources of difficulty in learning to read and spell.

International Literacy Association Daily
July 11, 2022

The International Literacy Association (ILA) announced today the winners of its 2022 Children’s and Young Adults’ Book Awards, a program that honors emerging authors whose work exemplifies the best from rising stars in the literature landscape. The 13 titles from this year’s honorees represent a wide variety of genres, themes and topics. They include mind-grabbing examinations of nature and science, authentic and truthful portrayals of history and tales of resilience in the face of prejudice and injustice.

KQED Mindshift
July 11, 2022

Deciding what constitutes good teaching is a messy business. Two researchers from the University of Maryland and Harvard University waded into this mess. They analyzed 53 elementary school teachers who had been randomly assigned to classrooms in their schools located in four different districts along the East Coast. The academics found that there was often a tradeoff between "good teaching" where kids learn stuff and "good teaching" that kids enjoy. Teachers who were good at raising test scores tended to receive low student evaluations. Teachers with great student evaluations tended not to raise test scores all that much.

Education Week
July 11, 2022

The Biden administration is positioning its new initiative to bring 250,000 tutors and mentors to American schools over the next three years as a way to help propel students to academic recovery in the wake of pandemic schooling disruptions. The administration plans to increase coordination among districts and education organizations as they use existing COVID-19 relief funds to supply tutors and support recovery efforts. The U.S. Department of Education will work with AmeriCorps and a group of education organizations to supply “tutors, mentors, student success coaches, integrated student support coordinators, and postsecondary education transition coaches” into schools, according to a fact sheet about the new initiative.

Check out more of our selected reading news stories. Each weekday, we gather interesting news headlines about reading and early education. You can also sign up for our daily email service (or a weekly digest), to get the latest reading headlines sent directly to you.

"A book is like a garden, carried in the pocket." — Chinese Proverb