Archived: Curriculum and Instruction articles

Many of our articles dated 2000 and earlier can now be found in this archive.

By: American Federation of Teachers (1999)

This brief from the American Federation of Teachers examines the strengths and weaknesses of Lindamood-Bell, one of five promising reading intervention programs they evaluated (also see Direct Instruction, Early Steps, Exemplary Center for Reading Instruction, and Reading Recovery in this section).



By: American Federation of Teachers (1999)
This brief from the American Federation of Teachers examines the strengths and weaknesses of Direct Instruction, one of five promising reading intervention programs they evaluated (also see Early Steps, Exemplary Center for Reading Instruction, Lindamood-Bell, and Reading Recovery in this section).

By: American Federation of Teachers (1999)
This brief from the American Federation of Teachers examines the strengths and weaknesses of Early Steps, one of five promising reading intervention programs they evaluated (also see Direct Instruction, Exemplary Center for Reading Instruction, Lindamood-Bell, and Reading Recovery in this section).

By: American Federation of Teachers (1999)
This brief from the American Federation of Teachers examines the strengths and weaknesses of Exemplary Center for Reading Instruction, one of five promising reading intervention programs they evaluated (also see Direct Instruction, Early Steps, Lindamood-Bell, and Reading Recovery in this section).

By: Susan Burns (1999)
Children who have difficulty learning to read often run into one or more of three stumbling blocks: difficulty with the alphabetic principle, with comprehension, and with fluency. Find out about these stumbling blocks in this overview.

By: Learning First Alliance (1998)
If 40 percent of all third-graders are not reading adequately today, reducing this substantially by the time children being born today reach third grade will be an enormous undertaking.

By: Catherine Snow, Susan Burns, Peg Griffin (1998)
Reading ability is determined by many factors, and requires the development of certain skills through early reading instruction to attain initial success and build on it.

By: Bonnie Grossen (1998)
The statement "research says" can be used to mean a variety of things. Find out a classification system for the reliability of research findings so that you can evaluate the strength of research-based recommendations for instruction.

By: Learning First Alliance (1998)
Children who are learning English as a second language have been taught to read both with and without using their native language as a base for learning. More research is needed to determine the effectiveness of different types of instruction, but read what the research does show about what works with English language learners.

By: Learning First Alliance (1998)
To become life long readers, children in second grade and up need excellent instruction and experience with a wide variety of engaging texts. Here is a list of recommended areas for reading instruction in second grade and beyond.

By: Catherine Snow, Susan Burns, Peg Griffin (1998)
Reading is essential to success in our society. The ability to read is highly valued and important for social and economic advancement. Of course, most children learn to read fairly well. In this report, we are most concerned with the large numbers of children in America whose educational careers are imperiled because they do not read well enough to ensure understanding and to meet the demands of an increasingly competitive economy.

By: Susan Brady, Louisa Moats (1997)
Recent research has provided a clearer picture about reading difficulties and how to prevent them. This position paper of the International Dyslexia Association argues for reform in teacher preparation to reflect these research-based understandings.

By: Marilyn Jager Adams (1990)
One of the earliest efforts in the recent trend to synthesize what we know from reading research, Marilyn Adams' 1990 book, "Beginning To Read" was a landmark review of the research on phonics and reading acquisition. Read her description of what she did and what she learned as she went through the process of producing this report.

"There is no substitute for books in the life of a child." — May Ellen Chase