Decodable Text Sources

Two first grader girls reading decodable text

Decodable text is a type of text used in beginning reading instruction. Decodable texts are carefully sequenced to progressively incorporate words that are consistent with the letter–sound relationships that have been taught to the new reader. This list of links, compiled by The Reading League, includes decodable text sources for students in grades K-2, 3-8, teens, and all ages.

Best for young readers (K-2)

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This list is republished from The Reading League. The Reading League's mission is to build educator knowledge of how to teach reading using evidence-based, highly effective methods of reading instruction and assessment. The League has over 3000 members: teachers, professors and researchers, administrators, parents, people with dyslexia and other reading difficulties, school psychologists, speech and language pathologists, and others.

The Reading League (2022)

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Comments

Thank you so much for this list. It is great! I am taking a Aim Pathways class and it goes along with everything included in the new science of reading, moving away from leveled readers.

I am fortunate enough to be able to put together a purchase order for our district. I know each student is quite different, I am curious to know about how many books a student may need to progress through various levels. I am not sure how many to request. We currently use Fundations as our phonics scope & sequence. This follows a fairly typical progression. Any suggestions??

Is anyone working on an app to scan a book and determine any book's percentage of decodability?

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"Writing is thinking on paper. " — William Zinsser