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What Else Matters in Teaching Reading

What Else Matters in Teaching Reading

Even if a school has an excellent reading curriculum in place, other factors play a critical role in helping students become strong readers. These include a teacher's skill with classroom management, differentiated instruction, working with the students' parents, and other interventions to help struggling readers.

Browse the selection of videos, articles, research briefs, and guides below to get started. Or follow these links to explore these resource sections in depth:

Featured Video: What Else Matters in Teaching Reading

For Teachers

Differentiated instruction is based on the premise that instructional approaches should vary and be adapted in relation to individual and diverse students. This brief looks at how differentiation strategies applied to reading can be designed to help students learn a range of skills including, phonics, comprehension, fluency, word prediction, and story prediction.
Peer tutoring links high achieving students with lower achieving students or those with comparable achievement for structured learning. It promotes academic gains as well as social enhancement. This brief discusses three research-supported peer tutoring strategies: Cross-Age Tutoring; Peer-Assisted Learning Strategies (PALS); and Reciprocal Peer Tutoring (RPT).
Classrooms today have students with many special needs, and teachers are often directed to "modify as necessary." The following article takes the mystery out of modifying your teaching strategies with concrete examples that focus on students' organizational skills.
There are a variety of grouping formats that are effective for teaching reading to students with learning disabilities: whole class, small group, pairs, and one-on-one. Learn more about the research and implications for practice for using each format in the general education classroom.
Classrooms can be perilous in a number of ways for students with learning disabilities. Here are some tips to remember when working with students with LD.
Literacy centers offer meaningful learning experiences where students work independently or collaboratively to meet literacy goals.
Research shows that students need at least 90 minutes of uninterrupted reading instruction per day in order for sufficient student reading development, and that this instruction must be dense: systematically delivering explicit teacher directions; scaffolded over time; and differentiated across the classroom.
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Reading Blogs
Maria Salvadore
Maria Salvadore
July 10, 2014
June 24, 2014
"Once you learn to read, you will be forever free." — Frederick Douglass