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Writing

Writing

A child's writing development parallels their development as a reader. Print awareness develops in young children as a result of being read to by adults and having other literacy experiences. Part of print awareness is the realization that writing is created with instruments such as pens, pencils, crayons, and markers. Children begin to imitate the writing that they see in the environment. What often starts as scribbling ends up being important clues to a child’s understanding that print carries meaning.

Our Looking at Writing interactive tool features writing samples from real kids pre-K to third grade. You'll find advice about instruction, guidance on assessment, classroom strategies, video, and more.

To help build writing skills at home, see our Top Writing Apps >

Featured Video: Writing

For Teachers

This article presents a developmental framework of informational writing developed from a study of children's writing in K-5 classrooms. See examples of children's compositions at each developmental level, and learn how to use this continuum to support increasingly more mature forms of informational text.

While some young writers may struggle with traditional literacy, tapping into new literacies like digital storytelling may boost motivation and scaffold understanding of traditional literacies. Three types of struggling writers are introduced followed by descriptions of ways digital storytelling can support their development.
Eli, a young boy, tells us what it is like to have dysgraphia. Regina Richards, a well-known expert on dysgraphia (and Eli's mom), explains how to help children who struggle with the challenges Eli describes. Practical techniques discussed include POWER: Prepare, Organize, Write, Edit, Revise.
This practice guide provides four recommendations for improving elementary students' writing. Each recommendation includes implementation steps and solutions for common roadblocks. The recommendations also summarize and rate supporting evidence. This guide is geared toward teachers, literacy coaches, and other educators who want to improve the writing of their elementary students.
Keeping a science notebook encourages students to record and reflect on inquiry-based observations, activities, investigations, and experiments. Science notebooks are also an excellent way for students to communicate their understanding of science concepts, and for teachers to provide students with feedback.
An introduction to 6 + 1 Trait® Writing, customized rubrics, student self-assessment, and peer editing.
Learn from an expert why some kids with learning disabilities struggle with writing and how some instructional approaches can help.
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"Oh, magic hour, when a child first knows she can read printed words!" — A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, 1943