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Assistive Technology

Assistive Technology for Students with Learning Disabilities: A Glimpse of the Livescribe Pen and Its Impact on Homework Completion

Harper, Kelly A; Kurtzworth-Keen, Kristin; Marable, Michele A. Assistive Technology for Students with Learning Disabilities: A Glimpse of the Livescribe Pen and Its Impact on Homework Completion. Education and Information Technologies, 2017, Vol. 22(5), p.2471-2483.

This research article looked the effectiveness of an assistive technology tool, the Livescribe Pen (LSP), with an elementary student identified with dyslexia over a one-year study with teachers, parent, and child. While the LSP was primarily utilized for curriculum accessibility and an audio tool to promote academic independence, the study's findings reveal its impact as an assistive technology on both academic successes for children with disabilities as well as non-academic gains. These included an increase in independence, more time for social activities, and the ability to develop strategies for homework success. Most importantly, the academic team and the parent reported a sense of higher aspirations for this student; ones they had not thought possible previously. Finally, the study revealed two elements critically important for students with disabilities. Those are the importance of fostering communities of support and the importance of self-determination.

Designing an Assistive Learning Aid for Writing Acquisition: A Challenge for Children with Dyslexia

Latif, Seemab; Tariq, Rabbia; Latif, Rabia. Designing an Assistive Learning Aid for Writing Acquisition: A Challenge for Children with Dyslexia. Studies in health technology and informatics, 2015 Vol. 217, pp. 180-8.

This article highlights the benefits of using the modern mobile technology features in providing a learning platform for young dyslexic writers. An android-based application is designed and implemented to encourage the learning process and to help dyslexic children improve their fundamental handwriting skill. In addition, a handwriting learning algorithm based on concepts of machine learning is designed and implemented to decide the learning content, evaluate the learning performance, display the performance results, and record the learning growth to show the strengths and weaknesses of a dyslexic child. The results of the evaluation provided by the participants revealed that application has potential benefits to foster the learning process and help children with dyslexia by improving their foundational writing skills.

Assistive technology as reading interventions for children with reading impairments with a one-year follow-up

Emma Lindeblad, Staffan Nilsson, Stefan Gustafson & Idor Svensson. Assistive technology as reading interventions for children with reading impairments with a one-year follow-up. Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, Vol 12 (7) 2017.

This pilot study looked at the possible transfer effect on reading ability in children with reading difficulties to compensate for their reading deficiencies. The study used assistive technology, smartphones and tablets. The 35 pupils aged 10-12 years were assessed five times with reading tests. Also, their parents and teachers were surveyed regarding their experience of using assistive technology. The study outcome shows that using AT can create transfer effects on reading ability one year after the study was finished. The study highlights that children with reading disability may develop at the same rate as non-impaired readers.

Using Assistive Technology in Teaching Children with Learning Disabilities in the 21st Century

Adebisi, Rufus Olanrewaju; Liman, Nalado Abubakar; Longpoe, Patricia Kwalzoom. Using Assistive Technology in Teaching Children with Learning Disabilities in the 21st Century. Journal of Education and Practice, 2015, Vol6(24), p14-20.

This paper was written to expose the meaning, benefits, and purpose for using assistive technology for children with learning disabilities. The paper discusses the various types of assistive technology devices that were designed and used to solve written language, reading, listening, memory and mathematic problems of children with learning disabilities. The possible challenges faced by developing nations in using assistive technology were mentioned.

"Reading is not optional." —

Walter Dean Myers