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What You Need to Know Before Letting Your Kids Read E-Books

Time Magazine
Could e-books actually get in the way of reading? That was the question explored in research presented last week by Heather Ruetschlin Schugar, an associate professor at West Chester University, and Jordan T. Schugar, an instructor at the same institution. The Schugars reported the results of a study in which they asked middle school students to read either traditional printed books, or e-books on iPads. The students' reading comprehension, the researchers found, was higher when they read conventional books. In a second study looking at students’ use of e-books created with Apple's iBooks Author software, the Schugars discovered that the young readers often skipped over the text altogether, engaging instead with the books’ interactive visual features. While their findings are suggestive — especially for parents and teachers who have questioned the value of e-books — they are preliminary, and based on small samples of students. More substance can be found in the Schugars' previous work.

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"There is no frigate like a book, to take us lands away" — Emily Dickinson