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Five Teaching Tips for Helping Students Become 'Wild Readers'

Education Week Teacher

As a teacher, I share my love of reading with my students and try to inspire and encourage them to read more. Setting aside time for them to read in class, building a classroom library of accessible, interesting books, and providing opportunities for my students to preview, share, and talk about books works for many. Over the years, my middle school and upper elementary students have read 30 or more books a year, without incentives or extrinsic rewards. No matter what their reading experiences were in the past, all of my students read more and report greater motivation and interest with reading. Habitual readers exhibit an array of individual characteristics that define their reading lives, but through surveys of 900 adult readers, my colleague, Susan Kelley, and I have identified five habits that translate well to classroom instruction.

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"So please, oh PLEASE, we beg, we pray, go throw your TV set away. And in its place you can install, a lovely bookshelf on the wall." — Roald Dahl