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Special education

Kate DiCamillo Summer Book Picks: Try Accessible Versions for Readers Who Struggle with Print

"Summer Kid Book Suggestions from author Kate DiCamillo and Others," an article published on June 2 in the Washington Post, lists favorite books that make good reading during the summer or any time of the year. And, there is some good news about DiCamillo's and the others' best bets.

Webinar Watch: Try Summer Learning Online: Boost Accessible + Truly Individualized Learning

Free Webinars from well-respected sources are plentiful this summer. All found here advance the use of accessible educational materials and technology devices with learning supports. These go a long way to help students stay on grade, reach individualized education goals, and master district objectives and their state standards of learning. Accessible materials are the only way to close an achievement gap when print fails. The webinar sponsors, descriptions, dates and time are:

11 Take-Aways: Understood.org Panel of Dyslexia Experts Signal Need for Ed Changes

Understood.org experts convened July 14 in Washington, D.C. at the Newseum broadcast studio to help inform parents and build their confidence about raising children and youth with learning and attention issues. Panelists included:

Decoding Dyslexia's Call for School Change Can Find Support from Experts Like Susan Barton

Waves of advocates for dyslexia are coming to Capitol Hill next week to meet with legislators. Parents from Decoding Dyslexia are convening on July 14-15 to get the attention of their legislators.

Remembering Walter Dean Myers: Are His Books Accessible to Readers with Dyslexia?

Readers can count on Walter Dean Myers to bring them stories that had been left off the shelf.

"What made Walter special wasn’t necessarily his books or writing, although those are still pretty special. No, what made Walter stand out was his tireless belief that the telling and reading of all kinds of stories mattered, that teens mattered, communities and families mattered, and that libraries and librarians mattered."

School Library Journal's Wiki Offers Resources About Students with Disabilities with a Nod to UDL

"Libraries play a catalytic role in the lives of people with disabilities by facilitating their full participation in society. Libraries should use strategies based upon the principles of universal design to ensure that library policy, resources and services meet the needs of all people," according to the School Libary Journal (SLJ).

Disabilities or Not: Great Ideas for Digital Summer Learning That Work All Year Long

To be sure teachers and related services personnel offer top summer learning ideas that include accessible educational materials (AEM) here are suggestions from reliable resources that can stand up to learning demands all year long.

Hook Kids on a Book Series! We Add Accessibility

Meet two ambassadors for summer reading who are advocating for high quality summer learning experiences that boost literacy and establish a habit of reading.

AEM Center: "School's Out, Summer Learning Begins!" Check Out Digitally Desirable Resources

Of course, diversions from a schoolyear workload should be high on the "things to do" list when the summer break starts; but a knowing staff at the National Center on Accessible Educational Materials (AEM) understands that a teacher's search for ways to support students and assure their success is never put aside.

Create Summer Readers with "Audie 2015" Audiobook Standouts

Here's list to grow readers from the world of audiobooks, the format for learning that engages struggling and other readers when books in print do not.

The format, that is essential for students with print disabilities, helps learners access the same books that their peers are reading in print. The literacy that can result from "ear reading" creates "academic" knowledge and the "social" opportunity to "talk books" and be part of literacy conversations struggling readers so often miss.

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"The things I want to know are in books. My best friend is the man who'll get me a book I [haven't] read." — Abraham Lincoln