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Social & emotional

Will You Get a "Letter to My Teacher" Like These Pleading for Dyslexia Awareness + Instruction?

"Sophia's Dyslexia Fight Song," posted on YouTube by Lisa Grannucci on Aug. 7 (3.21 min.) is a video letter by a student with dyslexia to her 5th grade teacher. She makes a compelling case for instruction that is delivered this year so that she can succeed in school. Teachers not only need awareness, they need strategies, accessible educational materials, and instructional methods that may differ from the needs of other students.

Experts Weigh in on Dyslexic Students Reading Aloud; Find a Pronunciation Guide to Ease Anxiety

Their peers often know how much students with dyslexia dread reading aloud in front of others, and hopefully teachers do, too. If not, many experts in dyslexia advise educators across the curriculum to avoid putting these students on the spot and, moreover, to give them opportunities to rehearse if they accept the challenge or volunteer to read in front of a partner or group. Sample some of the advice: 

Diverse Books Blossom, Including Disability! Download a Free Booktalking Kit from WNDB™

We Need Diverse Books™ (WNDB) just launched a Booktalking Kit that is now available to download at no cost. The kit is comprised of 30 titles and helps to increase the comfort level involved in identifying, reading, and discussing books that feature diverse characters, including those with disabilities. The kit also considers diversity among authors.

5 Reasons Why Dyslexic, Other Young Readers Need Accessible Books to Grow Emotionally

Young people with dyslexia and other print disabilities need the same opportunities for social-emotional learning as their peers. Some of this growth occurs as they read books. A student with a print disability needs the same benefit from literature; but this student requires an accessible version in order to access the text. This is possible at no cost and happening for students whose educational team considers and elects accessible education materials (AEM) during an Individualized Education Program (IEP) meeting. 

El Deafo: Virginia Author-Illustrator Turns Her Use of an Assistive Technology Device into a Strength

Students who use a device to support their access to the curriculum often struggle because assistive technology (AT) can make them feel different from their peers.

Savvy "Parent" Websites Paint Pictures of Disability Supports, Solutions That Educators Can Love!

Two "Don't Miss" websites that target parents of students with disabilities, do double duty and serve information needs for teachers, administrators, and related services personnel, too.

Both of the resources that follow are brimming with news, essential information, and hand-picked experts. Thankfully, they take on —rather than leave to someone else — the most serious concerns about improving the learning and social lives of student with disabilities.

Are You Helping Students with Dyslexia Get A's: Achievement, Accessibility, Accommodations, AT?

Teaching students with dyslexia and other print disabilities requires informed school administrators, teachers, related services personnel, and parents working together. Their efforts to establish eligibility for accessible educational materials (AEM=AIM) can assure that students who need it can access grade-level content in order to meet or exceed state standards.

No more Pooh?

Many classics of children's literature involve animals that behave like people. I've certainly likened several two-legged people I know to Eeyore. I often think like the Cat in the Hat on a dull, rainy day, looking for good, clean, indoor mischief. And in my house, Farmer Duck became a metaphor for unappreciated hard work.

Helping kids communicate emotions through picture books

Even the youngest child communicates her needs and feelings. Just ask a parent. They understand the difference in their infant's cries; some say hurt, hungry, uncomfortable, and on occasion just plain angry. Let's face it; all children come with their own unique temperament and they learn to express how they're feeling one way or another. Children often learn how to express themselves by observing the adults in their lives. Not only do adults model healthy responses, but they help children gain the words and labels to associate with various emotions.

Overcoming the odds

Everyone knows the story of how Helen Keller's tenacity (and the help of a special teacher) overcame her disabilities. Most know that President Franklin Delano Roosevelt, who led the nation during depression and war, had polio. Blindness hasn't stopped Stevie Wonder from topping pop music charts nor did it prevent Dr. Katherine Schnieder from obtaining a Ph.D. to become a noted psychologist. Each of these people is celebrated for what they could do and have done not for a disability.

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"I have always imagined that paradise will be a kind of library." — Jorge Luis Borges