LD

6 Resources from The NCTE 2014 Exhibit Hall Mostly Hidden Among Zillions of Books in Print

Teachers were buzzing about and checking out many wonderful books in the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) Exhibit Hall on Nov. 22. Having so many wonderful books in print to examine was like a picnic for some who browsed and chatted happily at this 2014 annual conference.

A crowd lined up way in advance (like shoppers at Best Buy before a big sale) for the freebie books in print that vendors give away at when the hall closes.

How to "Read with Your Ears," from an AT Specialist, Plus Resources That Support Dyslexia

Students with print disabilities using text-to-speech assistive technology (AT) have a good chance to acquire content in general education classes and to learn independently as compared with a learning aide reading information aloud to them from a computer screen.

7 Reasons to Pick e-Books

E-Books can be a better read, says Michael Kozlowski, a mainstream writer and book reviewer who specializes in horror, self help, humor and comedy.

On the website "Goodereader.com," Koslowski reports that there are good reasons to go with e-Books; and he spells them out in a recent article, eBooks vs. Print — The Reasons Why Digital Is Better.

Six words can say so much

As LD Awareness month winds down, I want to share a few words (literally!) with you. They come from the 6 Word Parent Story contest that the National Center for Learning Disabilities (NCLD) ran earlier this month. NCLD received over 1,400 entries from parents of kids with learning differences. The parent entries range from hopeful, "No longer three grade levels behind," and "Sarah is smart, and is trying," to those that made me nod with understanding, "Silent e's.

Too good to be true? Treatments and therapies for LD

Parents of kids who struggle in school want to help their child in any way they can. This is especially true for parents of kids with learning disabilities. I've sat through many conferences with parents of a child with LD who are eager to find "the thing" — the type of instruction, the experience, or the treatment that will help their child struggle less and succeed in school. Unfortunately, there's a lot of junk out there claiming to be that "thing" that will "treat" a child's learning disability.

Digital tools for kids with special needs

You might think that with all the talk about customizing digital tools for young children with individual needs, we'd hear even more about specific technologies that can help. I was mulling this thought over the other day when I discovered an unread Marshall Memo on my coffee table from a couple of weeks ago. I love the Marshall Memo, especially since Kim Marshall takes the time to read 44 journals every week and report back on the big take-aways. Sometimes I put it aside to read the New Yorker or click around on the Huffington Post, but it's a mistake.

Project Write

If there's someone who knows about teaching writing, it's Steve Graham. He's a nationally recognized professor, teacher, and researcher in the field of writing. The bulk of his work is with students with learning disabilities. His writing is always clear, informative, and helpful.

Learning more about learning disabilities

All of us who have worked with young children have worked with kids who struggle. Many of us have worked directly with kids with learning disabilities (LD). PBS NewsHour is putting together a terrific series about kids with LD as part of the American Graduate project. I encourage you to read, watch and share! Among the resources:

What does good homework look like?

Teachers give homework just about every night of the week. A good homework assignment can provide students with practice with a skill already taught, can prepare students for an upcoming test, and can extend a project or topic under study. A poorly designed homework assignment can bring tears and frustration and a lost opportunity to build a bridge between what's being taught in school and talked about at home. Homework struggles are particularly real for struggling readers and for students with LD.

Making meaning

Sometimes books come with separate pieces that can be manipulated, adding a special dimension. Books are turned into games, mysteries, or some other kind of activity. Some are successful, others not so, but each of these books tries to engage, entertain, educate, and stimulate readers' interest.

Pages

"Fill your house with stacks of books, in all the crannies and all the nooks." — Dr. Seuss