7 Assistive Tech Finds from Dependable Sources: Read These Over The Thanksgiving School Break

Assistive technology ideas overflow in these articles collected during 2015. The next school break might be a good time to consider some of them to ease instruction for students who struggle in school. 

Lindamood Bell Reading: Effects Are Potentially Positive, Mixed, Says US DOE Clearinghouse

A new report from the U.S. Department of Education's Institute of Education Sciences describes an update for the Lindamood Bell approach to reading instruction (LiPS®). Findings show some potentially positive effects and some mixed effects.

Can Be Important

10 Specialists Pick Apps, Websites to Help Special Needs, Struggling Readers Love to Learn

Apps and websites for special needs and other struggling learners are best when sources are trusted, juried, or chosen by people we respect. Here is a round up of chosen apps. Some are targeted to special needs learners, while others are intended to help all students love to learn whether or not they have identified disabilities. 

Identify, Intervene as Early as Kindergarten for Students with Dyslexia, Researchers Say

In research just published by the University of California at Davis and Yale University, educators can find advice to heed now about promptly identifying and intervening with students who are dyslexic.

20 Questions/Answers about Dyslexia That Teachers Can Use to Reshape Instruction

Dyslexia often is confusing for parents and teachers as the manner in which it presents can differ widely among children and youths. Dyslexia can go undetected for a long time, but it is neurologically based, known to be inherited, and will not be outgrown. Once students fall behind, their problems connected with reading, writing, and spelling can become complicated by negative feelings that affect their self-esteem.

7 Ways To Make National Family Literacy Day, Reading More Accessible, More Inclusive

National Family Literacy Day® falls on Nov. 1 2015. This national observance often kicks off a month of family literacy activities in libraries, schools, and community settings. It is a time for educators, librarians and others to celebrate learning differences and many ways to read. Put a spotlight on accessible digital text and alternatives to print. Build a nation of readers. 

Be Like Sherlock: Use PAR/uPAR Data to Determine Who Needs Reading Accommodations

The popular fictional detective, Sherlock Holmes said,“it’s a capital mistake to theorize before you have the data.” Ben Johnston makes the same point when schools seek school success for struggling readers. He offers a solution for improving decisions whenever questions about providing reading accommodations seem more like a game of chance than a science. 

Few Know Their Library Loans Out e-Books: Clues to the Local e-Book Kingdom with a Caution

A vast majority of libraries in the United States have an e-book collection but few patrons know the books are there for loan, according to writer Michael Kozlowski.

Decoding Dyslexia Utah Spells Out 15 Things Never to Say to Parent of a Child with Dyslexia

As school opens and teacher-parent conversations begin again, members of Decoding Dyslexia Utah offer advice on what they hope not to hear from educators or others.

DD Utah is part of a national grassroots organization that is working to stem what members describe as "limited access to educational interventions for dyslexia and other language-based learning disabilities within our public schools."

Advocate for Accessible Digital Books During "Read an E-Book Day" Coming Sept. 18

OverDrive, the service that gives library card holders access to free digital books, eBooks and more, invites public participation for Read an eBook Day on Sept. 18. This is an opportunity for teachers, other educators, and parents to advocate for library collections to include eBooks that offer flexible rather than fixed or static digital text. There are different types of digital text and the flexible text is best for most struggling readers 


"Once you learn to read, you will be forever free." — Frederick Douglass