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Intervention & prevention

Same thing next year? Grade retention.

We're approaching the fourth grading period at our school, which leads some teachers and parents to think about whether a struggling child should be retained. It's never an easy conversation to have.

Dyslexia: A primer

I love the Florida Center for Reading Research. The center is directed by Barbara Foorman and Joe Torgesen. And no one that works there must need sleep! They're always cranking out really good reports and publications. It's one of the first places I go when researching something.

Darn hard work: Working with struggling readers

Working with struggling readers is darn hard work. Progress is slow, and it takes an enormous amount of effort. Really concerted, dedicated, sustained effort. The students I work with usually make me want to bang my head against a wall out of frustration and leap across the room for joy, and that's within a 45 minute tutoring session!

Retention attention

The Reading Rockets service Ask the Experts gets a lot of questions about a lot of topics. Grade retention is one of the most common question topics, particularly this time of year.

As a teacher, have you considered retaining a student? As a parent, has someone recommended your child not be promoted to the next grade?

Three years growth in a few months? Don't buy it.

Every week headlines from newspapers around the world tout "reading interventions" that claim fantastic results.

Singing software that "boosts students' reading skills by more than a grade level in nine weeks" or a physical education program during which students "did reading exercises and gym activities at the same time" and after the 2 1/2-month study, students increased three grade levels in reading.

Wouldn't it be nice?

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"Fill your house with stacks of books, in all the crannies and all the nooks." — Dr. Seuss