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Dyslexia

Audiobooks Recorded by Screen Actors Guild Volunteers Widen Accessible Book Choices

Teachers who like using Storyline Online, the free literacy website where voice artists/actors from the Screen Actors Guild read children's books, will also enjoy Learning Ally audiobooks that also are read by professionals. Through a volunteer program, the "Acted Community" has about 130 voice artists and professional actors who bring their talents to Learning Ally's accessible book space. 

Will You Get a "Letter to My Teacher" Like These Pleading for Dyslexia Awareness + Instruction?

"Sophia's Dyslexia Fight Song," posted on YouTube by Lisa Grannucci on Aug. 7 (3.21 min.) is a video letter by a student with dyslexia to her 5th grade teacher. She makes a compelling case for instruction that is delivered this year so that she can succeed in school. Teachers not only need awareness, they need strategies, accessible educational materials, and instructional methods that may differ from the needs of other students.

Confused About Assistive Technology? These Guides to AT Offer Answers, Resources

Assistive technology (AT) helps students with disabilities access their curriculum and close achievement gaps. Just who gets AT is a decision made by educational teams that operate differently across school systems nationwide. Some districts have AT specialists on staff with an inventory of supports, while others do not. 

6 Pitfalls/Solutions from "Dyslexia in the Schools," an E-Book that Could Change Parent Advocacy

A free e-book and guide from an expert on dyslexia, Kelli-Sandman-Hurley, aims to dispel myths about dyslexia. It also cautions parents to be less trusting of school personnel if they suspect their child's reading difficulties stem from this particular reading difficulty. She gives specific advice on how parents can advocate for their child during an Individualized Education Program (IEP) planning meeting in order to avoid delays and to secure the prompt delivery of appropriate services.

Kate DiCamillo Summer Book Picks: Try Accessible Versions for Readers Who Struggle with Print

"Summer Kid Book Suggestions from author Kate DiCamillo and Others," an article published on June 2 in the Washington Post, lists favorite books that make good reading during the summer or any time of the year. And, there is some good news about DiCamillo's and the others' best bets.

Webinar Watch: Try Summer Learning Online: Boost Accessible + Truly Individualized Learning

Free Webinars from well-respected sources are plentiful this summer. All found here advance the use of accessible educational materials and technology devices with learning supports. These go a long way to help students stay on grade, reach individualized education goals, and master district objectives and their state standards of learning. Accessible materials are the only way to close an achievement gap when print fails. The webinar sponsors, descriptions, dates and time are:

Experts Weigh in on Dyslexic Students Reading Aloud; Find a Pronunciation Guide to Ease Anxiety

Their peers often know how much students with dyslexia dread reading aloud in front of others, and hopefully teachers do, too. If not, many experts in dyslexia advise educators across the curriculum to avoid putting these students on the spot and, moreover, to give them opportunities to rehearse if they accept the challenge or volunteer to read in front of a partner or group. Sample some of the advice: 

11 Take-Aways: Understood.org Panel of Dyslexia Experts Signal Need for Ed Changes

Understood.org experts convened July 14 in Washington, D.C. at the Newseum broadcast studio to help inform parents and build their confidence about raising children and youth with learning and attention issues. Panelists included:

Decoding Dyslexia's Call for School Change Can Find Support from Experts Like Susan Barton

Waves of advocates for dyslexia are coming to Capitol Hill next week to meet with legislators. Parents from Decoding Dyslexia are convening on July 14-15 to get the attention of their legislators.

Remembering Walter Dean Myers: Are His Books Accessible to Readers with Dyslexia?

Readers can count on Walter Dean Myers to bring them stories that had been left off the shelf.

"What made Walter special wasn’t necessarily his books or writing, although those are still pretty special. No, what made Walter stand out was his tireless belief that the telling and reading of all kinds of stories mattered, that teens mattered, communities and families mattered, and that libraries and librarians mattered."

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"Oh, magic hour, when a child first knows she can read printed words!" — A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, 1943