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Autism and Aspergers

Include at Recess

Have you ever felt like recess is the hardest part of the day to support? Me too! Check out my latest vlog post to learn options for inclusion on the blacktop and beyond.

These ideas are from my book, Don’t We Already Do Inclusion?

Flex your groupings

In most instances, educators will be using assessment data and classroom observations to create flexible groupings in the classroom. Other times, however, teachers may want to group or pair students randomly. This type of grouping works well for many different types of lessons including community-building activities, idea sharing, small-group discussions, or the exploration of materials.

This “Off the Page” selection is from my book Universal Design Daily.

Pick a stick, any stick

In any effective and student-centered classroom, the voices of learners should be heard often; they should be asking and answering questions, sharing ideas, and expressing their thoughts. Some students, however, struggle to engage in some or all of these behaviors. They may need models for asking appropriate questions or adding relevant comments.

Using fascinations to teach and challenge

Too often, student interests are seen as a hindrance to learning, when they can actually be very helpful to both students and teachers. In this video, I discuss how to take a student’s passion — be it calendars, vacuum cleaners, superheroes, dolphins, detectives, or Ozzy Osbourne — and turn it into classroom support.

New year, new goals

Happy New Year!

I had a lot of great feedback about this post in the last few years, so I am sharing it again to kick off 2018. I hope it will help you meet your inclusion-related goals as you get back to work this week.

Schedules and timers and lists … oh my!

What if I told you it was possible to make some (if not most) of your students feel more comfortable by just adopting a few EASY strategies each day, week, and month? What if I told you these strategies would not cost a thing and would also help you — as the teacher get a bit more organized? What if I told you these strategies could also help students learn new skills? Are you intrigued? If so, tune in to the latest episode of “Off the Page.” Be sure to share this one widely — these simple ideas can make or break a successful learning experience for some students.

Goal setting for co-teachers

It’s November and, therefore, it’s time for a new episode of “Off the Page.” In this segment, I am sharing a goal setting tool from 30 Days to the Co-Taught Classroom. Don’t skip this one if you don’t co-teach, though! This strategy is a smart one and can work well for any collaborative team big or small.

School Library Journal's Wiki Offers Resources About Students with Disabilities with a Nod to UDL

"Libraries play a catalytic role in the lives of people with disabilities by facilitating their full participation in society. Libraries should use strategies based upon the principles of universal design to ensure that library policy, resources and services meet the needs of all people," according to the School Libary Journal (SLJ).

Resources for parents of kids with special needs: Back-to-school edition

Parents of kids with special needs, whether a child has learning or physical differences, often have additional considerations and worries to contend with during back to school time. I've gathered a few resources that may smooth over a bump or two and get you started on your advocacy efforts for the year.

"There is more treasure in books than in all the pirate's loot on Treasure Island." — Walt Disney