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Experts Q&A

Learn more about how to help young readers and writers reach their full potential, from nationally-known literacy and education experts. The questions here were submitted by our readers. We hope you find answers that will be helpful at home or in the classroom as you support your young learners! Please revisit this section often, as we will be soliciting questions from our readers and adding new experts Q&A.


Tracy Gray

Dr. Tracy Gray

Director, the National Center for Technology Innovation (NCTI) and the Center for Implementing Technology in Education (CITEd)
Educational Technology

What options are available for audio versions of textbooks?

What technology is available to help a nine-year-old read?

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Top Articles

There are certain characteristics of groups and individual children that increase their likelihood of struggling with reading. Find out how to use knowledge of these risk factors to help prevent reading problems for these children.
English language learners are at risk for future reading difficulties for a number of reasons. Here are some factors all teachers of ELLs should know.
Knowing children with a family history of difficulties are more likely to have trouble learning to read means that efforts can be made with these children to prevent difficulties from developing.
Children may struggle with reading for a variety of reasons, including limited experience with books, speech and hearing problems, and poor phonemic awareness.
Hearing is critical to speech and language development, communication, and learning. Children with listening difficulties due to hearing loss or auditory processing problems continue to be an underidentified and underserved population.

Especially for Parents

For almost 40 percent of kids, learning to read is a challenge. So in addition to talking, reading, and writing with their child, families play another important role — being on the lookout for early signs of possible trouble.
Dyslexia is the most common cause of reading, writing and spelling difficulties. This article provides a brief overview list of typical signs of dyslexia in preschool and kindergarten.
When a child is having a language or reading problem, he just may need more time to learn language skills. Some children might have trouble seeing, hearing, or speaking, while others may have a learning disability. If you suspect a problem, it's important to get help quickly.
Healthy hearing is critical to a child's speech and language development, communication, learning, and social development. Children who do not hear well are at an increased risk of becoming struggling readers. Here are some signals that may indicate a hearing problem.
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"The things I want to know are in books. My best friend is the man who'll get me a book I [haven't] read." — Abraham Lincoln