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What should I do for my child who has an IEP but still has trouble with handwriting, taking notes, and writing at an appropriate speed?

Question: 

What should I do for my child who has an IEP but still has trouble with handwriting, taking notes, and writing at an appropriate speed?

Answer: 

The following articles describe some typical characteristics of students who struggle with the physical act of writing:

If you see some of your child’s struggles described in these articles, you may want to call an IEP meeting to share your concerns. At this time, you and the other members of the IEP team can discuss whether the goals, objectives, accommodations, modifications, and types and level of services your child is receiving are meeting his needs in the area of writing. This would also be a good time to discuss whether your child’s writing challenges are most likely related to the disability label under which he has an IEP or if further evaluation is warranted to get a clearer picture of why writing is such a struggle for him.

Regardless of the cause of your child’s writing difficulties, he may experience greater success, confidence, stamina, and productivity by using a computer, software that aids in the writing process, and other relevant assistive technology. You and the rest of the IEP team should discuss the possibility of incorporating keyboarding skills and technological tools in your child’s IEP as goals, objectives, and accommodations in his everyday academic experience.

The sooner your child’s writing challenges can be systematically addressed, the more likely he will be to reach his true potential in writing.

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"I used to walk to school with my nose buried in a book." — Coolio