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A video interview with

Seymour Simon

Kirkus Reviews called him the "dean of science writers." The Smithsonian Institution re-published 12 of his books. The National Science Teachers Association has named more than half of his books "Outstanding Science Trade Books for Children." Through his ability to write about science in a way that is accurate, interesting, and accessible, Seymour Simon has earned his reputation as a trusted source of information for curious young minds across the country.

You can watch the interview below, view the interview transcript, read a short biography of Seymour Simon, or see a selected list of his children's books. (This video is also available on YouTube and iTunes.)

Biography

There were plenty of clues in Seymour Simon's childhood that pointed toward his future profession. As a young boy growing up in urban New York City, he used to spend time in a vacant lot studying the small plants and animals that lived there. In the second grade, Simon read science fiction books and wrote a story called Space Monsters. As a teenager, he was elected president of the Junior Astronomy Club at the American Museum of Natural History.

Seymour Simon graduated from the Bronx High School of Science and later earned a degree in animal behavior. For 23 years he taught science to junior high school students in New York City. After publishing a number of articles and books for children, Simon gradually transitioned into his new full-time career as a science writer.

Seymour Simon has now published more than 200 books for children on topics as diverse as oceans, planets, trains, tornadoes, volcanoes, gorillas, earthquakes, and the human heart. During his long career, Simon has won many awards, including The Washington Post–Children's Book Guild Nonfiction Award for the body of his work.

From his house in New York's Hudson River Valley, Seymour Simon continues to research interesting topics, take photographs, and write new science books for children.

"I used to walk to school with my nose buried in a book." — Coolio