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A video interview with

Christopher Myers

Christopher Myers comes from a long line of creative storytellers. In this exclusive video interview with Reading Rockets, Christopher Myers talks about his Brooklyn neighborhood, his work, and how reading touches every part of his life.

You can watch the interview below, view the interview transcript, read a short biography on Christopher Myers, or see a selected list of his children's books. (This video is also available on YouTube and iTunes.)

Biography

While in his twenties, Christopher Myers established himself as one of today's most talented children's book illustrators. In 1998, Myers won a Caldecott Honor for his illustrations in Harlem. The following year, he wrote and illustrated Black Cat, a book that received a Coretta Scott King Honor. Myers is not afraid to push the boundaries of his own art, often experimenting with a combination of paints, photographs, and cut-paper collages. In addition to writing and illustrating his own stories, Myers often illustrates books written by his father, award-winning author Walter Dean Myers.

A Young Illustrator

Christopher Myers comes from a long line of storytellers. His grandfather had a talent for telling imaginative stories. His father wrote award-winning books from home. Not surprisingly, Christopher grew up with the desire to tell his own tales. But his favorite pastime was drawing.

Christopher Myers' parents took his drawing seriously. They encouraged him to practice every day for an hour and-a-half. At age 20, Myers illustrated Monster, a novel written by his father. After studying at Brown University in Rhode Island, Myers returned to New York and quickly established himself in the field of children's literature. His illustrations received a Caldecott Honor, two Coretta Scott King Honors, and rave reviews.

From his home in Brooklyn, Christopher Myers continues to experiment with his art, both for children's books and beyond. He is also a fine artist, photographer, and clothing designer.

"Reading should not be presented to children as a chore or duty. It should be offered to them as a precious gift." — Kate DiCamillo