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A video interview with

Jarrett Krosoczka

Jarrett Krosoczka has been passionate about storytelling through words and pictures since he was a young kid. Since the publication of his first picture book Good Night, Monkey Boy in 2001, Krosoczka has gone on to publish a shelfull of lively, colorful stories — from farm animals who rock (Punk Farm) to a purple elephant living in the city (Ollie the Purple Elephant) to the wildly popular and funny Lunch Lady graphic novel series.

You can watch the interview below, view the interview transcript, read a short biography on Jarrett Krosoczka, or see a selected list of her children's books. (This video is also available on YouTube and iTunes.)

Biography

Jarrett Krosoczka grew up in Worcester, Massachusetts, and as a boy was a fan of comic books and animation. He explored his creative talents at the Worcester Art Museum, where his grandparents enrolled him as a sixth-grader. His interest in creating books for young children was piqued when he first volunteered as a teen at The Hole in the Wall Gang Camp, a program for children with life-threatening illnesses. Krosoczka began his professional career by illustrating educational readers for a national publisher while still an undergraduate at Rhode Island School of Design.

In 2001, Random House Children's Books published Good Night, Monkey Boy and Krosoczka hasn't stopped or slowed down since. By 2011, he has authored and illustrated 16 published books — 10 picture books and six graphic novels. He is the two-time winner of the Third to Fourth Grade Book of the Year in the Children's Choice Book Awards and his Punk Farm and Lunch Lady series are both in development to be feature films.

Jarrett is happily living out his childhood dream in Northampton, Massachusetts, where he resides with his wife and daughter and their pug, Ralph Macchio. In honor of his late grandparents and all the support and encouragement they gave him, he founded the Joseph and Shirley Krosoczka Memorial Youth Scholarships at the Worcester Art Museum.

"I used to walk to school with my nose buried in a book." — Coolio