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A video interview with

Mary Ann Hoberman

Mary Ann Hoberman was named the Children's Poet Laureate by the Poetry Foundation in 2008 and received the 2003 Award for Excellence in Poetry for Children from the National Council of Teachers of English. She is the author of more than 40 books for children, including A House Is a House for Me, which won the National Book Award, and the popular shared reading series, You Read to Me, I'll Read to You. Whether writing about llamas in pajamas or a raucous auk, her poems celebrate the pure joy of language and reading aloud.

You can watch the interview below (where Hoberman is joined by Linda Winston, her co-editor on The Tree that Time Built), view the interview transcript, read a short biography of Mary Ann Hoberman, or see a selected list of her children's books. (This video is also available on YouTube and iTunes.)

Biography

Mary Ann Hoberman was born in 1930 in Stamford, Connecticut. In high school, she wrote for the school newspaper and was a yearbook editor. She and her husband, architect and artist Norman Hoberman, raised four children in their Connecticut home. Hoberman has taught writing and literature to students at all levels — elementary school through college. But ever since her first book All My Shoes Come in Twos was published in 1957 (inspired by her own children and illustrated by her husband), Hoberman's primary focus has been writing for young people.

Hoberman's most recent books include the 2009 poetry anthology The Tree that Time Built (co-edited with Linda Winston), and Hoberman's first novel Strawberry Hill, also published in 2009. The Tree that Time Built is filled with poems (some penned by Hoberman) and commentary that reveal the deep connections between science and poetry.

Through 50+ years of writing, Hoberman's work remains consistent in its craft, simplicity, playful use of language, and sensitivity to children's deepest feelings. About poetry, she says, "poetry is fun and you can go from fun and light verse and word play and you can segue very nicely into far more serious ideas and use of words and you bring the children with you."

"Outside of a dog, a book is a man's best friend. Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read." — Groucho Marx