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Spring Is in the Air

Spring is in the air! Animals awaken. Baseball beckons. March winds begin to blow. Get ready for the new season by taking a look at some of its signs — in books!

Quotable Quotes: The more that you read, the more things you will know. The more you learn, the more places you'll go. -- Dr. Seuss

Finding Spring

By: Carin Berger
Genre: Fiction
Age Level: 3-6
Reading Level: Beginning Reader

As Maurice's mother begins to hibernate, the bear cub impatiently goes out to find spring. Other animals — and readers — will recognize Maurice's mistaken token of spring and enjoy the lush collage illustrations of the season when it finally arrives.

Hooray for Hoppy

By: Tim Hopgood
Genre: Fiction
Age Level: 3-6
Reading Level: Beginning Reader

Hoppy, a small gray rabbit, uses his five senses to find out if spring has arrived yet. When it does, he calls his rabbit friends to share it with him. A recap of the five senses and what they do (and how Hoppy used them) finishes this lively look at a new and colorful season.

How Things Grow

By: Eric Carle
Genre: Nonfiction
Age Level: 0-3
Reading Level: Pre-Reader

A word on one side is illustrated on the opposing page of each spread. Lift the sturdy flap, and the egg becomes a chick, the acorn becomes an oak tree, etc. Even a very familiar caterpillar becomes a handsome butterfly in this thoughtfully presented glimpse of spring things.

Legends: The Best Players, Games, and Teams in Baseball

By: Howard Bryant
Genre: Nonfiction, Biography
Age Level: 9-12
Reading Level: Independent Reader

Sophisticated baseball aficionados will appreciate the highs (and lows) of the game over decades, organized by its three seasons: spring, summer, fall. The author's work as a sports writer is evident in his chatty, approachable style.

My Bike

By: Byron Barton
Genre: Fiction
Age Level: 3-6
Reading Level: Beginning Reader

Tom rides his bicycle, passing busses, cars, and even an elephant. He then dons his costume and make-up for his job as a unicycle-riding circus clown. Broad forms and bright colors introduce Tom's mode of transportation including the names of all the parts of a unicycle.

The Rookie Blue Jay

By: David Kelly
Illustrated by: Mark Meyers
Genre: Fiction, Mystery
Age Level: 6-9
Reading Level: Independent Reader

Baseball fans Mike and Kate solve the mystery surrounding the lackluster play of their favorite rookie. Fans of baseball are sure to enjoy this easier to read mystery, the latest in an appealing series.

Welcome to the Neighborhood

By: Shawn Sheehy
Genre: Nonfiction
Age Level: 6-9
Reading Level: Independent Reader

Forest animals "live as neighbors" and survive by building. The homes and their inhabitants are presented in stunning, earth-toned pop-ups accompanied by a brief but informative and engaging text.

When the Wind Blows

By: Linda Sweeney
Illustrated by: Jana Christy
Genre: Poetry
Age Level: 3-6
Reading Level: Beginning Reader

A grandmother and her grandson enjoy flying a kite on a windy spring day near their seaside home. Lush, textured illustrations show the landscape and animal inhabitants and the way wind plays with hats. Staccato rhymes chronicle the joy-filled day that ends with a shower.

When the Wind Blows

By: Stacy Clark
Illustrated by: Brad Sneed
Genre: Nonfiction
Age Level: 6-9
Reading Level: Independent Reader

Many things happen when the wind blows. Dune grass bends, waves spray, and "Copper whirls 'round/Between two magnets/High aboveground" to generate electricity that is used to power our nation. Lyrical text and realistic illustrations provide a creative introduction to wind power.

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"To learn to read is to light a fire; every syllable that is spelled out is a spark." — Victor Hugo, Les Miserables