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On the Go!

How do things move from one place to another? Lots of things — including people — travel by boat, airplane, truck, bus or train. We’re always on the go! So take a look at these books to laugh or learn about the way people and other things travel.
Quotable Quotes: The more that you read, the more things you will know. The more you learn, the more places you'll go. -- Dr. Seuss

Alphabet Trucks

By: Samantha Vamos
Illustrated by: Ryan O'Rourke
Age Level: 3-6
Reading Level: Beginning Reader

There are a surprising number of trucks, introduced from A to Z in a rhyming, informative text.  Upper and lower case letters are cleverly used in the simple graphic illustrations, sure to engage readers while introducing a wide range of trucks.

Big Rig

By: Jamie Swenson
Illustrated by: Ned Young
Age Level: 3-6
Reading Level: Beginning Reader

Frankie is an 18-wheeler with a big personality who shares onomatopoeic sounds he makes and the bright sights he sees as he delivers his cargo. The truck and all he meets along the road are expressively illustrated accompanied by animated language.

Go! Go! Go! Stop!

By: Charise Mericle Harper
Age Level: 3-6
Reading Level: Independent Reader

Bulldozer was the first to get up when Little Green rolled into town and yelled GO which continued until Little Red came to town and hollered STOP. Red and Green are later joined by Little Yellow's SLOW DOWN. Vehicles with personality populate this funny, vehicle-filled saga.

Locomotive

By: Brian Floca
Age Level: 6-9
Reading Level: Independent Reader

They met in the middle, the workers who built the railway across the United States. The narration speaks directly to readers which follows two unnamed children journey to California. Combined with richly detailed illustration, this dramatic, informative journey is the winner of the 2014 Caldecott Medal.

My Bus

By: Byron Barton
Age Level: 3-6
Reading Level: Beginning Reader

Joe drives his car to his bus where he picks up five dogs and five cats, then drops some off to continue their travel by boat, plane, and train. Boldly colored illustrations and broad shapes much like the author used in My Car are sure to appeal.

Pete the Cat: Old MacDonald Had a Farm

By: James Dean
Age Level: 3-6
Reading Level: Beginning Reader

Pokerfaced Pete the cat sings the traditional song with his guitar as he travels the farm in a red pickup truck and his big green tractor. Deadpan illustrations add verve and humor to the familiar tune and farm animal sounds.

Subway

By: Anastasia Suen
Illustrated by: Karen Katz
Age Level: 3-6
Reading Level: Beginning Reader

Rhythmic language and lively illustration invite readers to join a mother and her child as they travel on the subway.  The young girl enjoys the sights and sounds of a diverse city when they travel uptown by going "down, down, down."

The Little Airplane

By: Lois Lenski
Age Level: 3-6
Reading Level: Beginning Reader

Mr. Small enjoys the view from his small aircraft. This is one of Lenski's now classic "Little" picture books all of which are characterized by simple line illustrations and an unpretentious, straightforward story.

Train

By: Elisha Cooper
Age Level: 6-9
Reading Level: Independent Reader

Trains carry commuters and cargo; some travel in cities, others go places where there are no roads. Travel on trains through lively language and delicate but detailed illustrations. An author's note reveals she traveled by train to inform the reader and to let her imagination soar.

Tugboat

By: Michael Garland
Age Level: 3-6
Reading Level: Beginning Reader

From sunup to sundown in all types of weather, a small tugboat helps much larger ships into the New York harbor. Realistic illustrations and a crisp text present basic information about the tug and the ships it assists.

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