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Aiming for Access

June Behrmann

June Behrmann is a longtime special education teacher (pre-K to grade 6) who retired for about two seconds, and is now prospecting for accessible instructional resources. Follow June on Twitter @aimnoncat. Thank you to AIM-VA: Accessible Instructional Materials for sharing this blog with us.

Captions Support Readers Across America: Free Resources from DCMP Celebrate Dr. Seuss!

February 9, 2016

Teachers get ready to contribute in your own way to the literacy festivities ahead. Join the Defined and Caption Media Program's (DCMP) 11th annual Read Captions Across America (RCAA) event!

NEA Partner

DCMP partners with the NEA's Read Across America event on March 2 to celebrate Dr. Seuss' birthday. The resources are a colorful way to expand the message that accessibility is part of mainstream learning. Bring the message of reading with captions as a means of support for a variety of learners in your school.

Captioned media includes broadcast, Internet, DVD, and CD-ROM. Captions are a literacy tool and necessary for some students who are deaf or hard of hearing; however students with learning disabilities, English language learners, struggling readers and the general public in airports and restaurants also benefit from captions. 

Event Kit

The RCAA Event Kit consists of posters, bookmarks, and certificates celeblrating Dr. Seuss Day with accessibility in mind. DCMP members can order a DVD with six Dr. Seuss video titles. These are earliest story versions that I used with students who found them different but entertaining.

The DCMP has many types of media that are immediately available for streaming. Teachers who meet membership criteria can establish accounts that stay active into the future. These include: 

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"To learn to read is to light a fire; every syllable that is spelled out is a spark." — Victor Hugo, Les Miserables