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All Assistive Technology articles

By: Reading Rockets, Todd Cunningham (2017)

In this Q&A with Dr. Todd Cunningham, you'll learn the basics about assistive technology (AT) and how AT tools can help students with language-based learning disabilities to reach their full potential in the classroom.



By: Mira Kates Rose, Bronwyn Lamond, Todd Cunningham (2017)

If you suspect that your child would benefit from using AT at school, it's  important to discuss your observations, suggestions, and questions with your child's teachers. Make time to speak in person. In this article, you'll find tips for opening the conversation with example conversation starters.



By: Center on Technology and Disability (2017)

It is important for parents to understand the "language" of assistive technology so they can be informed advocates for their child's technology needs. The following glossary of terms can help parents learn about the kinds of assistive technologies that are currently available and how they can be used.



By: Center on Technology and Disability (2017)

Assistive technology is any kind of technology that can be used to enhance the functional independence of a person with a physical or cognitive disability. Get the basics in this fact sheet from the Center on Technology and Disability.



By: Center on Technology and Disability (2017)

In this webinar from the Center on Technology and Disability, you'll learn about a breakthrough speech technology that can create a custom voice that matches the vocal identity of a child with speech difficulties.



By: Center on Technology and Disability (2017)

In this webinar from the Center on Technology and Disability, two experts demonstrate and discuss various apps and Assistive Technology (AT) options, including wearable technology to support students with autism.



By: Reading Rockets, Rachael Walker (2017)

Audio books are a wonderful way to expose your child to complex language, expressive reading, and fantastic stories. Listening to audio books also gives kids the valuable and enjoyable experience of using their own imaginations to visualize the people and places they’re hearing about. Here, you’ll find guidance on what to look for in choosing audio books as well as listening tips.



By: Center on Technology and Disability (2017)

In this webinar from the Center on Technology and Disability, you'll learn about assistive technology funding sources for children with and without IEPs.



By: Center on Technology and Disability (2016)

In this webinar from the Center on Technology and Disability, AT professionals from Fairfax County, VA public schools demonstrate how to develop and conduct AT assessments, and implement activities in early childhood classrooms and at home.



By: Accessible Instructional Materials Center of Virginia (2016)

For children with print-based reading disabilities, accessible formats provide alternate versions of print-based books that function in much the same way as a print-based textbook. Learn about the different kinds of accessible formats, including digital talking books, enlarged text, electronic publications, and more.



By: American Institutes for Research, Center on Technology and Disability (2016)

This resource guide identifies high-quality, useful resources that address various aspects of accessibility: developing an accessibility statement, conducting an accessibility audit, acquiring accessible technology, and building professional development resources on accessibility for school staff and others.



By: Center on Technology and Disability (2016)

This guide focuses on ways to encourage the independence of a student with learning disabilities while in school and as they transition to college or work.



By: Center on Technology and Disability (2016)

In this webinar from the Center on Technology and Disability, AT specialists demonstrate AT tools to support students with dyslexia and discuss teaching interventions that are explicit, systematic, and multisensory, with plenty of opportunities for practice.



By: Tracy Gray, PowerUp WHAT WORKS (2016)

Many struggling and special needs students have a print disability. Teachers can meet these students’ needs by translating the three principles of Universal Design for Learning (UDL) into practice. Learn about the seven features of "born accessible materials" and how to select these materials for your school and classroom.



By: Center on Technology and Disability (2016)

Learn how to use two different Augmentative and Alternative Communication (ACC) activity boards to help toddlers and preschoolers expand what they are able to communicate.



By: Center on Technology and Disability (2015)

In this webinar from the Center on Technology and Disability, you'll learn about the current research on the use of technology for children birth to 8 years, and the implications of using these tech tools for early learning.



By: Reading Rockets (2013)

Your child may be at a school where they are using an approach called "flipped classroom" or "flipped lesson." If so, keep reading to find out more about the concept, and three ways that you can support flipped learning at home.



By: Center on Technology and Disability, Tots-n-Tech (2012)

Learn about AT devices that can be used to help children with disabilities participate more fully in literacy-promoting activities and routines.



By: Alise Brann, Tracy Gray, PowerUp WHAT WORKS (2012)

Learn how technology tools can support struggling students and those with learning disabilities in acquiring background knowledge and vocabulary, improving their reading comprehension, and making connections between reading and writing.



By: Patti Ralabate, American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (2012)

Universal Design for Learning (UDL) provides the opportunity for all students to access, participate in, and progress in the general-education curriculum by reducing barriers to instruction. Learn more about how UDL offers options for how information is presented, how students respond or demonstrate their knowledge and skills, and how students are engaged in learning.



By: Alise Brann, PowerUp WHAT WORKS (2011)

One motivating, engaging, and inexpensive way to help build the foundational reading skills of students is through the use of closed-captioned and subtitled television shows and movies. These supports can help boost foundational reading skills, such as phonics, word recognition, and fluency.



By: Bridget Dalton, Dana L. Grisham (2011)

Drawing on research-based principles of vocabulary instruction and multimedia learning, this article presents 10 strategies that use free digital tools and Internet resources to engage students in vocabulary learning. The strategies are designed to support the teaching of words and word learning strategies, promote students' strategic use of on-demand web-based vocabulary tools, and increase students' volume of reading and incidental word learning.



By: National Center for Technology Innovation (2010)

Speech recognition, also referred to as speech-to-text or voice recognition, is technology that recognizes speech, allowing voice to serve as the "main interface between the human and the computer." This Info Brief discusses how current speech recognition technology facilitates student learning, as well as how the technology can develop to advance learning in the future.



By: Family Center on Technology and Disability (2010)

The law requires that public schools develop appropriate Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) for each child. The IEP is a written plan for educating a child with a disability. The IEP describes the student's specific special education needs as well as any related services, including assistive technology.



By: Kristin Stanberry, Marshall H. Raskind (2009)

If your child has a learning disability, he or she may benefit from assistive technology tools that play to their strengths and work around their challenges.



By: Kristin Stanberry, Marshall H. Raskind (2009)

Learn about assistive technology tools — from abbreviation expanders to word-recognition software programs — that address your child's specific writing difficulties.



By: Kristin Stanberry, Marshall H. Raskind (2009)

Learn about assistive technology tools — from audiobooks to variable-speed tape recorders — that help students with reading.



By: National Center for Technology Innovation (2008)

This Info Brief provides information to help parents find and obtain alternative sources of funding for classroom- or home-based assistive technology when funds are not available through a child’s school.



By: National Center for Technology Innovation, Center for Implementing Technology in Education (CITEd) (2008)

Get the answers to frequently asked questions about accessing e-text through the National Instructional Materials Access Center (NIMAC). Find out how to obtain e-text so that students with learning disabilities can get printed material in the format they need.



By: Center for Applied Special Technology (CAST), LD OnLine (2007)

If your child cannot read their textbooks, they need digital copies of their books. Schools now can use National Instructional Material Accessibility Standard (NIMAS) to get e-text. Learn the details that will help you advocate for your child so they can use NIMAS. And learn where to find the publishers and producers that provide e-text.



"Never trust anyone who has not brought a book with them." — Lemony Snicket