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All Basics articles

By: Reading Rockets, Understood (2017)

The term “learning and attention issues” covers a wide range of challenges kids may face in school, at home and in the community. It includes all children who are struggling — whether their issues have been formally identified or not. Learning and attention issues are brain-based difficulties, and they often run in families. Find resources that can help kids be successful in school and in life!



By: International Dyslexia Association (2012)

Dysgraphia is a learning disability that affects a child's handwriting. Children with dysgraphia usually have other problems such as difficulty with written expression. Learn more about causes, the importance of early assessment, dysgraphia and spelling, and effective instructional strategies that strengthen written language skills.



By: National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities (NICHCY) (2010)

Get the basics on Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (AD/HD), including signs, treatment, accommodations in school, and tips for parents and teachers.



By: Kristin Stanberry, Marshall H. Raskind (2009)

If your child has a learning disability, he or she may benefit from assistive technology tools that play to their strengths and work around their challenges.



By: Kristin Stanberry, Lee Swanson (2009)

Research-based information and advice for sizing up reading programs and finding the right one for your child with a learning disability.



By: LD OnLine (2008)

Find out more about the different types of learning disabilities, how they're identified, and what types of instruction support students with LD.



By: Susan Hall (2008)

How do parents know if their child's reading delay is a real problem or simply a "developmental lag?" How long should parents wait before seeking help if their child is struggling with reading? Susan Hall answers these questions.



By: International Dyslexia Association (2007)

Do you think your child or student might have dyslexia? This fact sheet provides a definition of dyslexia, symptoms, prevalence, signs, and effects, as well as ways to help your child.



By: FPG Child Development Institute (2007)

Can teachers and parents of preschoolers identify learning problems early enough to prevent problems later in school? The Recognition & Response model helps adults know what to look for and how to help, so that later remediation and special education may not be necessary.



By: GreatSchools Editorial Staff (2007)

If you're thinking of hiring a private specialist to test your child for a learning disability, here are some key questions to ask yourself and the prospective evaluator.



By: Amy Milsom (2006)

The school experiences of students with disabilities can be positively or negatively influenced by the attitudes and behaviors of students and staff and by general school policies. School counselors can take the lead in assessing school climate in relation to students with disabilities and initiating interventions or advocating for change when appropriate. This article provides an overview of factors to consider in creating positive school experiences for students with disabilities and suggestions for intervention efforts.



By: Sally E. Shaywitz (2004)

The specific signs of dyslexia, both weaknesses and strengths, vary widely. Problems with oral language, decoding, fluency, spelling, and handwriting are addressed, as well as strengths in higher order thinking skills.



By: Sally E. Shaywitz (2004)

The earliest clues involve mostly spoken language. The very first clue to a language (and reading) problem may be delayed language. Once the child begins to speak, look for difficulties with rhyming, phonemic awareness, and the ability to read common one-syllable words.



"Once you learn to read, you will be forever free." — Frederick Douglass