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Archived: Phonics and Decoding articles

Many of our articles dated 2000 and earlier can now be found in this archive.

By: Bruce Murray (1999)
Thinking about the sounds in words is not natural, but it can be fun. Here are some games children can play to develop phonemic awareness, as well as a method for segmenting words that prevents children from distorting the pronunciation of the phonemes.

By: G. Reid Lyon (1997)
Invariably, it is difficulty linking letters with sounds that is the source of reading problems, and children who have difficulties learning to read can be readily observed.

By: Texas Education Agency (1996)
Children can use what they know about letter-sound matches to decode (figure out) written words.

By: Texas Education Agency (1996)
School-aged children build skills in a variety of areas to become successful readers. Learn activities parents can use at home to expand their knowledge of letter/sound relationships and skills in decoding, writing, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension of a variety of texts.

By: Texas Education Agency (1996)
Provide your child with the opportunity to learn that written words are made up of letters that match the sounds in spoken words.

By: National Center to Improve the Tools of Educators (1996)
Thousands of children have a learning disability, and many more fail in school because of difficulties in learning to read. An analysis of decades of research about how young children can best learn to read indicates that, in most cases, these difficulties can be prevented. The following are concrete strategies teachers can use to help students build a solid foundation for reading.

By: Reading Rockets (1992)
There are several informal assessment tools for assessing various components of reading. The following are ten suggested tools for teachers to use.

By: Marilyn J. Adams (1990)
One of the earliest efforts in the recent trend to synthesize what we know from reading research, Marilyn Adams' 1990 book, "Beginning To Read" was a landmark review of the research on phonics and reading acquisition. Read her description of what she did and what she learned as she went through the process of producing this report.

By: Marilyn J. Adams (1990)
One of the earliest efforts in the recent trend to synthesize what we know from reading research, Marilyn Adams' 1990 book, "Beginning To Read" was a landmark review of the research on phonics and reading acquisition. Read her description of what she did and what she learned as she went through the process of producing this report.

"A book is a gift you can open again and again." — Garrison Keillor