Menu

Archived: Phonemic Awareness articles

Many of our articles dated 2000 and earlier can now be found in this archive.

By: International Dyslexia Association (2000)
Dyslexia is a language-based disability that affects both oral and written language. With help, children with dyslexia can become successful readers. Find out the warning signs for dyslexia that preschool and elementary school children might display.

By: Bruce Murray (1999)
Thinking about the sounds in words is not natural, but it can be fun. Here are some games children can play to develop phonemic awareness, as well as a method for segmenting words that prevents children from distorting the pronunciation of the phonemes.

By: Learning First Alliance (1998)
The foundations for reading success are formed long before a child reaches first grade.

By: Susan Hall, Louisa Moats (1998)
Early experiences with sounds and letters help children learn to read. This article makes recommendations for teaching phonemic awareness, sound-spelling correspondences, and decoding, and includes activities for parents to support children's development of these skills.

By: Marilyn J. Adams, Barbara Foorman, Ingvar Lundberg, Terri Beeler (1998)
Research shows that the very notion that spoken language is made up of sequences of little sounds does not come naturally or easily to human beings. The small units of speech that correspond to letters of an alphabetic writing system are called phonemes. Thus, the awareness that language is composed of these small sounds is termed phonemic awareness.

By: Catherine Snow, Susan Burns, Peg Griffin (1998)
The Committee for the Prevention of Reading Difficulties in Young Children has compiled detailed lists of literacy accomplishments for children of different ages. Find out what the typical child can do in kindergarten.

By: G. Reid Lyon (1997)
Invariably, it is difficulty linking letters with sounds that is the source of reading problems, and children who have difficulties learning to read can be readily observed.

By: G. Reid Lyon (1997)
Learning how to read requires several complex accomplishments. Read about the challenges children face as they learn how sounds are connected to print, as they develop fluency, and as they learn to construct meaning from print.

By: Robert Sensenbaugh (1996)
With little or no direct instruction, almost all young children develop the ability to understand spoken language. While most kindergarten children have mastered the complexities of speech, they do not know that spoken language is made up of discrete words, which are made up of syllables, which themselves are made up of the smallest units of sound, called "phonemes." This awareness that spoken language is made up of discrete sounds appears to be a crucial factor in children learning to read.

By: National Center to Improve the Tools of Educators (1996)
Thousands of children have a learning disability, and many more fail in school because of difficulties in learning to read. An analysis of decades of research about how young children can best learn to read indicates that, in most cases, these difficulties can be prevented. The following are concrete strategies teachers can use to help students build a solid foundation for reading.

By: Ed Kame'enui, Marilyn J. Adams, G. Reid Lyon (1996)
Children from a variety of backgrounds struggle with learning to read. However, as described in this article, research points to one common reason they struggle, and common strategies to help them succeed.

By: ERIC Clearinghouse on Disabilities and Gifted Education (1995)
Early literacy activities help young children develop many skills. One of these skills is phonological awareness. Learn about phonological awareness and how parents can help children develop it.

By: Reading Rockets (1992)
There are several informal assessment tools for assessing various components of reading. The following are ten suggested tools for teachers to use.

By: Marilyn J. Adams (1990)
There are three powerful predictors of preschoolers' eventual success in learning to read.

"Reading should not be presented to children as a chore or duty. It should be offered to them as a precious gift." — Kate DiCamillo