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Archived: Parent Tips articles

Many of our articles dated 2000 and earlier can now be found in this archive.

By: Annick De Houwer (1999)
Many children are raised with a home language different from the language at school, and this has given rise to many misconceptions about language learning. This will help parents learn the facts, and get information about helping their second language learner.

By: Dawn Ramsburg (1998)
Historically, we used the term "reading readiness" to describe the early years as preparation for reading. Now, we use the term "emergent literacy" to characterize these early activities as part of a continuum of reading development, rather than as preparation for it. Find out how to support children's emergent literacy in this discussion of perspectives on development.

By: Catherine Snow, Susan Burns, Peg Griffin (1998)
How much a child is spoken to, and has the opportunity to speak, can play a great role in how reading difficulties develop.

By: Catherine Snow, Susan Burns, Peg Griffin (1998)
The Committee for the Prevention of Reading Difficulties in Young Children has compiled detailed lists of literacy accomplishments for children of different ages. Find out what the typical child can from ages three to four.

By: National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) (1997)
Even in infancy, children's experiences contribute to later reading success. These tips provide families with ideas for language and literacy activities for infants, toddlers, preschoolers, and primary grade children.

By: Wendy Schwartz (1996)
This article provides tips parents can use to find a high quality program for their children.

By: Texas Education Agency (1996)
Preschoolers who are getting ready to read expand their knowledge of the building blocks of oral and written language, and their use and appreciation of language. Learn activities parents can use at home to support children's growth in each of these areas.

By: Texas Education Agency (1996)
Preschoolers who are getting ready to read expand their knowledge of the building blocks of oral and written language, and their use and appreciation of language. Learn activities parents can use at home to support children's growth in each of these areas.

By: Texas Education Agency (1996)
Preschoolers who are getting ready to read expand their knowledge of the building blocks of oral and written language, and their use and appreciation of language. Learn activities parents can use at home to support children's growth in each of these areas.

By: Texas Education Agency (1996)
Preschoolers who are getting ready to read expand their knowledge of the building blocks of oral and written language, and their use and appreciation of language. Learn activities parents can use at home to support children's growth in each of these areas.

By: Texas Education Agency (1996)
Learning the meanings of new words (vocabulary) helps children to read more complex books and stories and to learn wonderful new things. Children learn new words by being read to and by reading on their own; the more children read, the more words they are likely to know.

By: Texas Education Agency (1996)
Children can use what they know about letter-sound matches to decode (figure out) written words.

By: Texas Education Agency (1996)
Children who identify quickly and correctly most of the words in the books that they are reading usually comprehend what they are reading.

By: Texas Education Agency (1996)
School-aged children build skills in a variety of areas to become successful readers. Learn activities parents can use at home to expand their knowledge of letter/sound relationships and skills in decoding, writing, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension of a variety of texts.

By: Texas Education Agency (1996)
Provide your child with the opportunity to learn that written words are made up of letters that match the sounds in spoken words.

By: Ed Kame'enui, Marilyn J. Adams, G. Reid Lyon (1996)
These tips for parents of children with learning disabilities emphasize to all parents the importance of helping children learn about letters and sounds. Get concrete advice for teaching the alphabet, raising awareness about sounds, and promoting letter-sound knowledge.

By: Bernice Cullinan, Brod Bagert (1996)
The following is intended to help you become a parent who is great at reading with your child. You'll find ideas and activities to enrich this precious time together.

By: Lynn Liontos (1994)
It's a fact! Children whose parents are involved in their education have better grades, a more positive attitude toward school, and more appropriate school behavior than those with less involved parents.

By: Marilyn J. Adams (1990)
There are three powerful predictors of preschoolers' eventual success in learning to read.

"There is no frigate like a book, to take us lands away" — Emily Dickinson