Menu

All Libraries articles

By: Reading Rockets (2012)
Nonfiction books give kids a chance to learn new concepts and vocabulary, as well as broaden their view of the world. Learn how to take a "book walk" with a new nonfiction book and how to model active reading.

By: Melissa Taylor (2012)
Most kids love stories, but not all love to read. Discover 10 creative ways to encourage active kids who would rather run than read, to enjoy digging into books.

By: Reading Rockets (2012)
Our interconnected and digital world demands a lot of our learners. Here are five simple ways to help build your child's critical thinking and problem-solving skills.

By: Reading Rockets (2012)
Finding the right book for your child means finding something your child wants to read AND making sure it's at the right level for your child.

By: Reading Rockets (2012)
Library Card Sign-up Month is a time to remind parents and children that a library card is the most important school supply of all.

By: Reading Rockets (2012)
Science fiction is a type of fiction where the stories revolve around science and technology of the future. As exciting as these books can be, it's good to remind your child that while science fiction may be based loosely on scientific truth, it is still fiction.

By: Reading Rockets (2011)
Many kids love to read about science and nature as well as real people, places, and events. Nonfiction books present information in engaging and interesting ways. Find out how you can help your child learn to navigate all the parts of a nonfiction book — from the table of contents to the diagrams, captions, glossary, and index.

By: Reading Rockets (2010)
Consider organizing a book swap for your neighborhood or block. It can be a simple afternoon undertaking, or with more time and effort, a fun event that will become an annual tradition!

By: Reading Rockets (2010)
Sharing lots of different kinds, or genres, of books with your child exposes him to different words, different kinds of images, and whole new worlds. This tip sheet suggests some genres to try with your young reader that complement 'traditional' fiction. Some are suggestions for read alouds, while others may be ones your child can read on his own.

By: Sharon Ruth Gill (2009)
Children's nonfiction picture books is a genre that is exploding in both quality and quantity. Recent nonfiction books reveal an emphasis on the visual, an emphasis on accuracy, and an engaging writing style. Suggestions are included for choosing and using nonfiction picture books in the classroom.

By: Reading Rockets (2009)
Day trips, vacations and special outings create special memories and great learning opportunities for families. Here are a few "stops" to make before your visit to help your child get the most out of a family or school educational experience.

By: Reading Rockets (2009)
Libraries are great resources for families with young children; you can find books, entertainment, educational and cultural enrichment, literacy tips, and other valuable information. Here are nine reasons to visit your public library!

By: Reading Rockets (2009)
Having interesting things to read at home is a great way to keep kids motivated. Below are a few questions to ask yourself about your home library. Some simple changes on your part can help you create an amazing home library, and help your child develop an early love of reading!

By: Mandy Gregory (2008)
How do you create a classroom library that is both organized and enticing to young readers? Here a teacher illustrates how she set up a classroom library. She provides tips on acquiring books and materials, organizing the shelves, creating labels, and making it cozy.

By: Reading Rockets (2008)
Starting a home library for your child shows him/her how important books are. Having books of his/her own in a special place boosts the chance that your child will want to read even more. Here are some ideas for creating your own home library.

By: Reading Rockets (2008)
Children are full of questions about the world around them, and summer is a perfect time to tap into your child's interests. Here are some ways to start a journey of discovery together.

By: Reading Rockets (2008)
Dads play a critical role in their children's literacy development by modeling reading, sharing stories, exploring the world together, and engaging in meaningful conversations that build critical thinking skills. Here are a few suggestions to help fathers strengthen their literacy connections with preschoolers.

By: Reading Rockets (2008)
Every time you pair a book with an experience, you are giving your child an opportunity to learn more about their world. Below are some suggestions for books and corresponding activities to extend your child's reading experiences.

By: Capstone Press (2007)
Are your students drowning in information, misinformation and downright bunk? Are information literacy skills tested in your state? Teaching information literacy skills has never been more important. But it's easier said than done. As teacher-librarians, how do we teach those critical, all-important information literacy skills in ways that capture and hold student interest?

By: Reading Rockets (2007)
Interesting experiences give kids a broader framework for new information they might encounter in books, and when kids have lots of experiences to draw on, they have a better chance of making a connection with what they read! Help your child build background knowledge this summer with these activities.

By: Kristina Robertson (2007)
Libraries today have changed in a number of ways to meet the demands of our modern society, but their underlying purpose for children is still to help them discover the joy of reading. As summer peaks, many local libraries advertise special summer reading programs and activities to keep children enthusiastic about reading.

By: Reading Rockets (2007)
Reading over the summer not only keeps your child from losing ground, but actually improves skills for the coming year. Here are some suggestions to keep a book in your child's hands over the summer months.

By: Reading Rockets (2007)
Favorite stories get shared many times over. Here's some advice about how to find a good children's book and what to do once you're reading together.

By: U.S. Department of Education (2007)
Parents — you are your child's most important teacher! Using a few of these ideas, you can help your child enter the classroom ready to read.

By: U.S. Department of Education (2005)
Creating a library of your child's books is a great way to show her how important reading is. It will also give her a special place to keep her books and will motivate her to keep pulling books from her own library to read. Here are some ideas for getting started!

By: Annette Lamb, Larry Johnson (2005)
Encourage students to become better listeners and readers through audiobooks.

By: Walter Minkel (2003)
If you're a children's librarian who wants to promote an upcoming summer reading program at your public library, start by targeting the local schools. After all, that's where the children are.

By: American Library Association (2000)
From preserving our past to breaking down boundaries, libraries serve to improve our democracy and our lives. Learn twelve ways they improve our country in this tribute to libraries.

By: U.S. Department of Education (1993)
Most people think of their public library solely as a source for books. However, libraries have many services and programs that can help children or the people who care for them. Learn what services libraries are likely to offer for preschool and school-aged children.

"You know you’ve read a good book when you turn the last page and feel a little as if you have lost a friend." — Paul Sweeney