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Archived: Early Literacy Development articles

Many of our articles dated 2000 and earlier can now be found in this archive.

By: U.S. Department of Education (1999)
When communities work together, they can improve the reading achievement of their children. Learn what efforts need to be made with preschool and school-aged children in order to improve reading achievement in America.

By: Catherine Snow, Susan Burns, Peg Griffin (1999)
With one-on-one conversation, dramatic play, and engaging read alouds, preschool teachers can promote children's language and literacy development. Learn about research studies on the characteristics of preschool environments that prepare children to become readers.

By: Catherine Snow, Susan Burns, Peg Griffin (1998)
The Committee for the Prevention of Reading Difficulties in Young Children has compiled detailed lists of literacy accomplishments for children of different ages. Find out what the typical child can do from birth through age three, from three to four, and in kindergarten, first, second, and third grades.

By: Dawn Ramsburg (1998)
Historically, we used the term "reading readiness" to describe the early years as preparation for reading. Now, we use the term "emergent literacy" to characterize these early activities as part of a continuum of reading development, rather than as preparation for it. Find out how to support children's emergent literacy in this discussion of perspectives on development.

By: Dawn Ramsburg (1998)
Historically, we used the term "reading readiness" to describe the early years as preparation for reading. Now, we use the term "emergent literacy" to characterize these early activities as part of a continuum of reading development, rather than as preparation for it. Find out how to support children's emergent literacy in this discussion of perspectives on development.

By: National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC), International Reading Association (1998)
The following are recommended teaching practices from the International Reading Association (IRA) and the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC).

By: Catherine Snow, Susan Burns, Peg Griffin (1998)
How much a child is spoken to, and has the opportunity to speak, can play a great role in how reading difficulties develop.

By: Catherine Snow, Susan Burns, Peg Griffin (1998)
Families differ enormously in the level to which they provide a supportive environment for a child's literacy development.

By: Susan Burns, Peg Griffin, Catherine Snow (1998)
Three main accomplishments characterize good readers. Find out what these accomplishments are, and what experiences in the early years lay the groundwork for attaining them.

By: Susan Hall, Louisa Moats (1998)
Early experiences with sounds and letters help children learn to read. This article makes recommendations for teaching phonemic awareness, sound-spelling correspondences, and decoding, and includes activities for parents to support children's development of these skills.

By: Catherine Snow, Susan Burns, Peg Griffin (1998)
The Committee for the Prevention of Reading Difficulties in Young Children has compiled detailed lists of literacy accomplishments for children of different ages. Find out what the typical child can from ages three to four.

By: Celia Genishi (1998)
The development of oral language is one of the child's most natural – and impressive – accomplishments.

By: Derry Koralek, Ray Collins (1997)
Whether a tutor is reading aloud, talking, or writing with a child, there are strategies for making these interactions even more valuable. Learn about these strategies in these tips for tutoring preschool and kindergarten children.

By: Derry Koralek (1997)
Learn how children develop oral language skills through interactions with their caregivers and families by reading sample conversations with preschoolers.

By: Derry Koralek (1997)
Learn how children develop oral language skills through interactions with their caregivers and families by reading sample conversations with toddlers.

By: Derry Koralek (1997)
Learn how children develop oral language skills through interactions with their caregivers and families by reading sample conversations with crawlers and walkers.

By: Derry Koralek (1996)
Learn how children develop oral language skills through interactions with their caregivers and families by reading sample conversations with babies.

By: Texas Education Agency (1996)
Preschoolers who are getting ready to read expand their knowledge of the building blocks of oral and written language, and their use and appreciation of language. Learn activities parents can use at home to support children's growth in each of these areas.

By: Texas Education Agency (1996)
Preschoolers who are getting ready to read expand their knowledge of the building blocks of oral and written language, and their use and appreciation of language. Learn activities parents can use at home to support children's growth in each of these areas.

By: Texas Education Agency (1996)
Preschoolers who are getting ready to read expand their knowledge of the building blocks of oral and written language, and their use and appreciation of language. Learn activities parents can use at home to support children's growth in each of these areas.

By: Texas Education Agency (1996)
Preschoolers who are getting ready to read expand their knowledge of the building blocks of oral and written language, and their use and appreciation of language. Learn activities parents can use at home to support children's growth in each of these areas.

By: Texas Education Agency (1996)
Provide your child with the opportunity to learn that written words are made up of letters that match the sounds in spoken words.

By: Bernice Cullinan, Brod Bagert (1996)
With this overview, learn why reading aloud to children from an early age is so important, and how to make it a motivating and meaningful experience.

By: National Center to Improve the Tools of Educators (1996)
Thousands of children have a learning disability, and many more fail in school because of difficulties in learning to read. An analysis of decades of research about how young children can best learn to read indicates that, in most cases, these difficulties can be prevented. The following are concrete strategies teachers can use to help students build a solid foundation for reading.

By: Bernice Cullinan, Brod Bagert (1996)
The following is intended to help you become a parent who is great at reading with your child. You'll find ideas and activities to enrich this precious time together.

By: ERIC Clearinghouse on Disabilities and Gifted Education (1995)
Early literacy activities help young children develop many skills. One of these skills is phonological awareness. Learn about phonological awareness and how parents can help children develop it.

By: Grover J. (Russ) Whitehurst (1992)
Dialogic reading works. Children who have been read to dialogically are substantially ahead of children who have been read to traditionally on tests of language development. Children can jump ahead by several months in just a few weeks of dialogic reading.

"Reading should not be presented to children as a chore or duty. It should be offered to them as a precious gift." — Kate DiCamillo