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Archived: Developmental Milestones articles

Many of our articles dated 2000 and earlier can now be found in this archive.

By: International Dyslexia Association (2000)
Dyslexia is a language-based disability that affects both oral and written language. With help, children with dyslexia can become successful readers. Find out the warning signs for dyslexia that preschool and elementary school children might display.

By: Catherine Snow, Susan Burns, Peg Griffin (1998)
The Committee for the Prevention of Reading Difficulties in Young Children has compiled detailed lists of literacy accomplishments for children of different ages. Find out what the typical child can do from birth through age three, from three to four, and in kindergarten, first, second, and third grades.

By: Learning First Alliance (1998)
The foundations for reading success are formed long before a child reaches first grade.

By: Catherine Snow, Susan Burns, Peg Griffin (1998)
The Committee for the Prevention of Reading Difficulties in Young Children has compiled detailed lists of literacy accomplishments for children of different ages. Find out what the typical child can do in third grade.

By: Catherine Snow, Susan Burns, Peg Griffin (1998)
The Committee for the Prevention of Reading Difficulties in Young Children has compiled detailed lists of literacy accomplishments for children of different ages. Find out what the typical child can do in second grade.

By: Catherine Snow, Susan Burns, Peg Griffin (1998)
The Committee for the Prevention of Reading Difficulties in Young Children has compiled detailed lists of literacy accomplishments for children of different ages. Find out what the typical child can do in first grade.

By: Catherine Snow, Susan Burns, Peg Griffin (1998)
The Committee for the Prevention of Reading Difficulties in Young Children has compiled detailed lists of literacy accomplishments for children of different ages. Find out what the typical child can do in kindergarten.

By: Catherine Snow, Susan Burns, Peg Griffin (1998)
The Committee for the Prevention of Reading Difficulties in Young Children has compiled detailed lists of literacy accomplishments for children of different ages. Find out what the typical child can from ages three to four.

By: National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) (1998)
Children go through certain phases of reading development from preschool through third grade – from exploration of books to independent reading. Find out what children at the second grade phase should be able to do, and what teachers and families can do to support their development at this stage.

By: National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) (1998)
Children go through certain phases of reading development from preschool through third grade – from exploration of books to independent reading. Find out what children at the first grade phase should be able to do, and what teachers and families can do to support their development at this stage.

By: National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) (1998)
Children go through certain phases of reading development from preschool through third grade – from exploration of books to independent reading. Find out what children at the kindergarten phase should be able to do, and what teachers and families can do to support their development at this stage.

By: National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) (1998)
Children go through certain phases of reading development from preschool through third grade – from exploration of books to independent reading. Find out what children at the third grade phase should be able to do, and what teachers and families can do to support their development at this stage.

By: National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) (1997)
Even in infancy, children's experiences contribute to later reading success. These tips provide families with ideas for language and literacy activities for infants, toddlers, preschoolers, and primary grade children.

By: Derry Koralek, Ray Collins (1997)
Play is the work of children – through play and interaction, children learn how to talk, listen, read, and write. Read about typical behaviors of emergent and beginning readers, and how each of these behaviors relate to reading and writing.

"Outside of a dog, a book is a man's best friend. Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read." — Groucho Marx