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Archived: Activities articles

Many of our articles dated 2000 and earlier can now be found in this archive.

By: Doris J. Johnson (1999)
Children with disabilities can benefit from the same language and literacy activities as all young children: being read to, having rich conversations, and playing games with sounds. However, children with disabilities may need these activities to be modified or intensified for maximum benefit. Find out about activities for struggling readers in these suggestions for parents.

By: Susan Hall, Louisa Moats (1998)
Early experiences with sounds and letters help children learn to read. This article makes recommendations for teaching phonemic awareness, sound-spelling correspondences, and decoding, and includes activities for parents to support children's development of these skills.

By: Texas Education Agency (1996)
Preschoolers who are getting ready to read expand their knowledge of the building blocks of oral and written language, and their use and appreciation of language. Learn activities parents can use at home to support children's growth in each of these areas.

By: Texas Education Agency (1996)
Preschoolers who are getting ready to read expand their knowledge of the building blocks of oral and written language, and their use and appreciation of language. Learn activities parents can use at home to support children's growth in each of these areas.

By: Texas Education Agency (1996)
Preschoolers who are getting ready to read expand their knowledge of the building blocks of oral and written language, and their use and appreciation of language. Learn activities parents can use at home to support children's growth in each of these areas.

By: Texas Education Agency (1996)
Preschoolers who are getting ready to read expand their knowledge of the building blocks of oral and written language, and their use and appreciation of language. Learn activities parents can use at home to support children's growth in each of these areas.

By: Texas Education Agency (1996)
Learning the meanings of new words (vocabulary) helps children to read more complex books and stories and to learn wonderful new things. Children learn new words by being read to and by reading on their own; the more children read, the more words they are likely to know.

By: Texas Education Agency (1996)
Children can use what they know about letter-sound matches to decode (figure out) written words.

By: Texas Education Agency (1996)
Children who identify quickly and correctly most of the words in the books that they are reading usually comprehend what they are reading.

By: Texas Education Agency (1996)
School-aged children build skills in a variety of areas to become successful readers. Learn activities parents can use at home to expand their knowledge of letter/sound relationships and skills in decoding, writing, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension of a variety of texts.

By: Texas Education Agency (1996)
Provide your child with the opportunity to learn that written words are made up of letters that match the sounds in spoken words.

By: Bernice Cullinan, Brod Bagert (1996)
The following is intended to help you become a parent who is great at reading with your child. You'll find ideas and activities to enrich this precious time together.

"There is no frigate like a book, to take us lands away" — Emily Dickinson