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Love Is in the Air

Love and affection are seen in many ways — from sending a card to singing a song or sharing a bedtime tale. Read how love is shown in school and at home in the books recommended here. They're certain to demonstrate that love is in the air — especially when shared with a young reader.
Quotable Quotes: The more that you read, the more things you will know. The more you learn, the more places you'll go. -- Dr. Seuss

Henry in Love

By: Peter McCarty
Age Level: 3-6
Reading Level: Beginning Reader

On the day that Henry's mom includes a special blueberry muffin in his lunch, Henry's teacher moves his desk next to Chloe. A smitten Henry — a young cat — gives his tasty treat to the attractive bunny. Soft illustrations and an understated text combine to create a winning portrait of infatuation and friendship.

Kiss Kiss

By: Selma Mandine
Age Level: 3-6
Reading Level: Beginning Reader

A child's teddy bear wonders about kisses, and so the child describes many familiar types of kisses from parents, grandparents, and even a dog. Gentle illustrations combine with a narration of child-like questions and answers. It ends, of course, with a "soft and warm and… delicious" kiss and the assurance of love.

Love

By: Rosemary Wells
Age Level: 0-3
Reading Level: Pre-Reader

A baby Max thoroughly enjoys his daily routine. He loves everyone and each activity — from waking up in his crib to driving in a car but he especially loves the one who makes his jelly toast! Repetition in a catchy cadence combines with Wells' signature illustrations in a sturdy, uncluttered format to share with the youngest.

My Heart Is Like a Zoo

By: Michael Hall
Age Level: 3-6
Reading Level: Beginning Reader

Rich, alliterative language is used in intriguing similes to create a rhythmic text illustrated with bright colors and bold forms — animals created by one or many heart shapes. From the opening to the final page where a resting child cuddles with a teddy bear made from heart shapes, this book is sure to fascinate readers.

My Love Will Be with You

By: Laura Krauss Melmed
Illustrated by: Henri Sorensen
Age Level: 3-6
Reading Level: Beginning Reader

The special place in fathers' hearts for their children is celebrated in this warmly illustrated, wise book. Rich language describes each animal dad's prediction of their child's growing up until a human father is pictured embracing an infant. This is as appealing as the author/illustrator's I Love You as Much.

Ramona and Her Father

By: Beverly Cleary
Illustrated by: Beverly Cleary
Age Level: 6-9
Reading Level: Independent Reader

Ramona deals with her father's job loss, her mom's return to work, and the normal trials of second grade in her own unique and very funny fashion. Her campaign to get her father to stop smoking is both a humorous and a very Ramona way to show her love for him.

Who Loves the Little Lamb?

By: Lezlie Evans
Illustrated by: David McPhail
Age Level: 3-6
Reading Level: Beginning Reader

Young animals are fussy, messy, pouting, and more — but still each "Mama loves her" little one. Gentle rhymes reassure the young that no matter how they behave or what they look like, Mama always loves them, reinforced as the human mother embraces her young son. Warm-toned watercolors enhance the rhythmic, rhyming text.

You're Lovable to Me

By: Kat Yeh
Illustrated by: Sue Anderson
Age Level: 3-6
Reading Level: Beginning Reader

In a happy but chaotic home, the bunnies had had a big day and a hard night — and Mama loved them throughout. As a tired Mama sits down at last, her dad comes in to reassure her that no matter how old children get, a parent's love continues. Small, detailed, line and wash illustrations complement this warm, comforting story.

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Maria Salvadore
Maria Salvadore
April 7, 2014
March 27, 2014
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"The man who does not read good books is no better than the man who can't." — Mark Twain