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Kindergarten Accomplishments

By: Catherine Snow, Susan Burns, Peg Griffin
The Committee for the Prevention of Reading Difficulties in Young Children has compiled detailed lists of literacy accomplishments for children of different ages. Find out what the typical child can do in kindergarten.

Below is a set of accomplishments that the successful learner is likely to exhibit. This list is neither exhaustive nor incontestable, but it does capture many highlights of the course of literacy acquisition that have been revealed through several decades of research. The timing of these accomplishments will to some extent depend on maturational and experiential differences between children, and upon the particular curriculum provided by a school.

  • Knows the parts of a book and their functions.
  • Begins to track print when listening to a familiar text being read or when rereading own writing.
  • "Reads" familiar texts emergently, i.e., not necessarily verbatim from the print alone.
  • Recognizes and can name all uppercase and lowercase letters.
  • Understands that the sequence of letters in a written word represents the sequence of sounds (phonemes) in a spoken word (alphabetic principle).
  • Learns many, thought not all, one-to-one letter sound correspondences.
  • Recognizes some words by sight, including a few very common ones (a, the, I, my, you, is, are).
  • Uses new vocabulary and grammatical constructions in own speech.
  • Makes appropriate switches from oral to written language situations.
  • Notices when simple sentences fail to make sense.
  • Connects information and events in texts to life and life to text experiences.
  • Retells, reenacts, or dramatizes stories or parts of stories.
  • Listens attentively to books teacher reads to class.
  • Can name some book titles and authors.
  • Demonstrates familiarity with a number of types or genres of text (e.g., storybooks, expository texts, poems, newspapers, and everyday print such as signs, notices, labels).
  • Correctly answers questions about stories read aloud.
  • Makes predictions based on illustrations or portions of stories.
  • Demonstrates understanding that spoken words consist of a sequences of phonemes.
  • Given spoken sets like "dan, dan, den" can identify the first two as being the same and the third as different.
  • Given spoken sets like "dak, pat, zen" can identify the first two as sharing a same sound.
  • Given spoken segments can merge them into a meaningful target word.
  • Given a spoken word can produce another word that rhymes with it.
  • Independently writes many uppercase and lowercase letters.
  • Uses phonemic awareness and letter knowledge to spell independently (invented or creative spelling).
  • Writes (unconventionally) to express own meaning.
  • Builds a repertoire of some conventionally spelled words.
  • Shows awareness of distinction between "kid writing" and conventional orthography.
  • Writes own name (first and last) and the first names of some friends or classmates.
  • Can write most letters and some words when they are dictated.

References

References

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Endnotes

Endnotes

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Excerpted from: Snow, C. E., Burns, S. M., & Griffin, P. Editors. (1998). Preventing Reading Difficulties in Young Children. National Research Council, National Academy of Sciences. Courtesy of National Academy Press. Reprinted with permission.

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